Worries About Middle School Transition and Subsequent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Classroom Goal Structure

Worries About Middle School Transition and Subsequent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Classroom Goal Structure

Worries About Middle School Transition and Subsequent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Classroom Goal Structure

Worries About Middle School Transition and Subsequent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Classroom Goal Structures

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Référence bibliographique [11356]

Duchesne, Stéphane, Ratelle, Catherine. F et Roy, Amélie. 2011. «Worries About Middle School Transition and Subsequent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Classroom Goal Structure ». The Journal of Early Adolescence, vol. 20, no 10, p. 1-30.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[The aim of the present study] was to identify heterogeneous profiles of the continuous adjustment variables and to examine their relationships with worries around the middle school transition. […] Another goal of this study was to examine the role of environmental variables that can protect students against the harmful effects of worries on adjustment. One such factor is classroom GS [goal structure].» (p. 4-5)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample for this study comprised of 342 adolescent-mother dyads (163 boys, 176 girls; 3 unspecified). […] Most adolescents were born in the province of Quebec (92%), spoke French at home (96.8%), and lived with both biological parents (68.60%).» (p. 8)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Les auteurs constatent la que «greater tendency of girls than boys to present these problems at the onset of adolescence (e.g., Graber, 2004). This tendency could be partly explained in turn by the greater concern of girls to please their parents and teachers, particularly in terms of academic performance (Pomerantz, Altermatt, & Saxon, 2002). Faced with actual or anticipated failure, girls might be more likely to feel that they had disappointed these adults, predisposing them to subsequent emotional problems.» (p. 19) Ils concluent que «studies have shown that anxiety tends to aggregate in families where anxious children are at higher risk to interact with parents who are themselves anxious (e.g., Ballash, Leyfer, Buckley, & Woodruff-Borden, 2006). It would therefore be useful to consider parental anxiety as a potentially confounding variable, especially as it could color how their children assess anxiety.» (p. 23)