Decision-Making Process of Family Caregivers Regarding Placement of a Cognitively Impaired Elderly Relative

Decision-Making Process of Family Caregivers Regarding Placement of a Cognitively Impaired Elderly Relative

Decision-Making Process of Family Caregivers Regarding Placement of a Cognitively Impaired Elderly Relative

Decision-Making Process of Family Caregivers Regarding Placement of a Cognitively Impaired Elderly Relatives

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Référence bibliographique [11354]

Ducharme, Francine, Couture, Mélanie et Lamontagne, Julie. 2012. «Decision-Making Process of Family Caregivers Regarding Placement of a Cognitively Impaired Elderly Relative ». Home Health Care Services Quarterly, vol. 31, no 3, p. 197-218.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Against this background, we undertook a longitudinal project geared to explaining how family caregivers make the decision to place a cognitively impaired relative. By placement, we mean transferring the relative to a facility (e.g., retirement residence, nursing home) that provides more services than the current living environment does. More specifically, the purpose of our study was to build an explanatory model of the decision-making process by carrying out a prospective qualitative follow-up of family caregivers having thought about placing an elderly relative.» (p. 199)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«In sum, for our study, 18 family caregivers were recruited who were considering the possibility of placing their relative in a new living environment that would provide more services than was presently the case. […] A total of 52 interviews were completed.» (p. 200)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The results show that the family caregiver’s entourage is in part responsible for activating the decision-making process regarding placement, particularly health care professionals and retirement residence directors. In this connection, Wilder and Lanier (2005) noted more specifically that it was common for the family doctor to be the one to introduce the idea of placement to the family caregiver. They also observed that, when a cognitively impaired elderly
person was hospitalized, a physician from the hospital could mandate a social worker to bring up the subject of placement with the patient’s family. [...] In our study, several cognitively impaired elderly persons were already living in retirement residences before a possible transition to a long-term care facility could be considered. This particularity of our sample might in part explain this finding. Indeed, most of the studies carried out to date have explored the decision-making process among family caregivers of elderly persons living at home.» (p. 212)