Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: The Predictive Role of Maternal Distress, Child Attachment, and Mother-Child Interactions

Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: The Predictive Role of Maternal Distress, Child Attachment, and Mother-Child Interactions

Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: The Predictive Role of Maternal Distress, Child Attachment, and Mother-Child Interactions

Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: The Predictive Role of Maternal Distress, Child Attachment, and Mother-Child Interactionss

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Référence bibliographique [11352]

Dubois-Comtois, Karine, Moss, Ellen, Cyr, Chantal et Pascuzzo, Katherine. 2013. «Behavior Problems in Middle Childhood: The Predictive Role of Maternal Distress, Child Attachment, and Mother-Child Interactions ». Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, vol. 41, no 8, p. 1311-1324.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he objective of the current study is twofold: 1) to examine the mediating role of mother-child interaction quality in the association between early maternal psychosocial distress and child behavior problems in middle childhood; 2) to examine in more detail the association between child clinical behavior problems and the distinctive mother-child attachment patterns using different categories of attachment groups, that is, organized, disorganized and controlling.» (p. 1312)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants in this study are 243 French-speaking mother-child dyads (122 girls) who are part of an ongoing longitudinal project investigating the influence of parent-child relationships on developmental adaptation.» (p. 1314)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In conclusion, results of this study help further understanding of the longitudinal influence of variables associated with the family environment on the social and emotional adaptation of children in middle childhood, a developmental period that remains under-investigated. Our results allow us to confirm the mediating role of the quality of mother-child interactions in the association between maternal psychosocial distress and the development of behavior problems beyond infancy. Our large sample size and the assessment of families over a 6-year period represent important strengths of the present study. Results of this study also suggest that long-held assumptions regarding the association between disorganized attachment and the development of later psychopathology should be revised in order to account for disorganized attachment subgroups and developmental differences.» (p. 1322)