Links between Different Measures of Mother/Father Involvement and Child Social Adjustment

Links between Different Measures of Mother/Father Involvement and Child Social Adjustment

Links between Different Measures of Mother/Father Involvement and Child Social Adjustment

Links between Different Measures of Mother/Father Involvement and Child Social Adjustments

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Référence bibliographique [11351]

Dubeau, Diane, Coutu, Sylvain et Lavigueur, Suzanne. 2013. «Links between Different Measures of Mother/Father Involvement and Child Social Adjustment ». Early Child Development and Care, vol. 183, no 6, p. 791-809.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study had two major objectives: (1) to compare different measures of parental involvement (in particular, those collected from mothers and fathers); and (2) to assess relations between a set of measures of parental involvement (maternal and paternal) and child social adjustment.» (p. 794)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«In other words we were interested to find answers to the two following questions: how do mothers and fathers assess their parental role in the family? Can these maternal and paternal roles measures predict child social adjustment?» (p. 794)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Forty-five dual-parent families with a preschool-aged child participated in the study. Twenty girls (mean age = 56 months, SD = 5.6) and 25 boys (mean age = 56.6 months, SD = 6.9) were recruited from childcare centres and preschools. The families lived in the Outaouais region in Quebec, Canada.» (p. 794)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results obtained regarding the first objective confirmed various ways in which fathers were involved with their families. Paternal involvement was reflected in parental accessibility, a relatively equitable division of household duties between spouses, and fathers’ perceptions of the importance of the different roles they played in the family. The respective contributions of these different ways of defining parental involvement are revealing on a number of levels. For example, parental accessibility measures, principally those concerned with the number of hours spent alone with the child, confirmed the greater responsibility assumed by mothers, despite full-time professional employment. […] With regard to the study’s second objective, the results show that not all of the different parental involvement measures described here are good indicators of child adjustment. Researchers must therefore be careful to choose measures in line with their study’s objectives. The measure of perceptions of the importance attributed to different roles in the family seems to be a more reliable measure of parental involvement.» (p. 803-804)