Determinants of Parents’ Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

Determinants of Parents’ Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

Determinants of Parents’ Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study

Determinants of Parents’ Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Studys

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [11350]

Dube, Ève, Bettinger, Julie A., Halperin, Scott, Bradet, Richard, Lavoie, France, Sauvageau, Chantal, Gilca, Vladimir et Boulianne, Nicole. 2012. «Determinants of Parents’ Decision to Vaccinate Their Children against Rotavirus: Results of a Longitudinal Study ». Health Education Research, vol. 27, no 6, p. 1069-1080.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of this study was to assess the determinants of Canadian parents’ acceptance to have their child vaccinated against rotavirus.» (p. 1070)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Invited participants were men and women of at least 18 years of age who were expecting a child or who were parents of a healthy newborn aged 0–6 weeks. In 2008–09, a convenience sample of parents were recruited prenatally or during medical postpartum visits in three Canadian cities (Vancouver, British Columbia; Quebec City, Quebec; and Halifax, Nova Scotia). […] In Quebec City, [248] parents were recruited at well-baby visits from physician offices. These three sites were chosen because of their large population and their dispersed geographic location.» (p. 1070)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In Quebec City, all parents were recruited in a pro-immunization pediatric clinic; this clientele might have been more pro-vaccine oriented than the general population and might have had easier access to immunization, more information about the rotavirus vaccine and thus felt more empowered to act on their intention than participants without these facilitating factors. This may explain why the proportion of vaccinated children is much higher in this location compared with the other study sites. It also may illustrate the positive effect of a health care provider’s recommendation to vaccinate, thus enabling access to the vaccine.» (p. 1078) «Another interesting finding was the association between parents’ sources of information about vaccination and their decision to have their child vaccinated against rotavirus. Compared with parents of unvaccinated children, parents who chose to vaccinate their children against rotavirus were more likely to report being informed on vaccination by a health professional and less likely to report using the Internet. This highlighted the positive influence of health professionals’ recommendations on vaccination behavior. Although our study did not measure the type of information parents sought from the Internet, other studies have shown that the Internet plays a large role in disseminating anti-vaccination information.» (p. 1078-1079)