Child Adjustment Following Parental Separation: The Role of Maternal Well-Being, Parenting Quality, and Household Income

Child Adjustment Following Parental Separation: The Role of Maternal Well-Being, Parenting Quality, and Household Income

Child Adjustment Following Parental Separation: The Role of Maternal Well-Being, Parenting Quality, and Household Income

Child Adjustment Following Parental Separation: The Role of Maternal Well-Being, Parenting Quality, and Household Incomes

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Référence bibliographique [11345]

Di Stefano, Gessica et Cyr, Francine. 2014. «Child Adjustment Following Parental Separation: The Role of Maternal Well-Being, Parenting Quality, and Household Income ». Journal of Child Custody, vol. 11, no 1, p. 5-24.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of the present study was not to construct a complex explicative model including all possible variables, but rather to examine specific factors among these, or combinations of factors, which help explain the relationship between parental separation and child outcomes.» (p. 9)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«This study hypothesized that 8-year old children of separation would exhibit higher levels of post-separation hyperactivity / impulsivity, anxiety, and physical aggression in comparison to their counterparts in non-separated families. The second hypothesis postulated that after accounting for post-separation maternal emotional well-being, quality of parenting, and household income, parental separation would no longer be a significant predictor of hyperactivity / impulsivity, anxiety, and physical aggression.» (p. 9)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD, 1998–2006). The QLSCD includes a cohort of children born from singleton births between October 1997 and July 1998 to mothers living in Quebec (Jetté & Desgroseilliers, 2000).» (p. 9)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In conclusion, it has been argued that the family is the most powerful context for optimal child development (Power, 2004). This study has shown that regardless of family type, mothers who practice poor parenting and experience emotional health problems are at increased risk of having a child with emotional or behavioral problems and that these variables are involved in children’s post-separation outcomes. These findings clarify some of the key aspects that parents and practitioners should focus on in helping children cope with parental divorce and separation. Intervention should target the improvement of mothers’ coping skills and emotional health, as well as the education of mothers on the importance of practicing good parenting. Our findings have implications for promoting the functioning of a group of at-risk youth who not only experience parental separation but who may experience a deterioration of their parents’ emotional health and parenting skills. Knowledge derived from the results of this study can help to target and prioritize this at-risk group in the development of psychological services.» (p. 20)