Curvilinear Associations Between Neuroticism and Dyadic Adjustment in Treatment-seeking Couples

Curvilinear Associations Between Neuroticism and Dyadic Adjustment in Treatment-seeking Couples

Curvilinear Associations Between Neuroticism and Dyadic Adjustment in Treatment-seeking Couples

Curvilinear Associations Between Neuroticism and Dyadic Adjustment in Treatment-seeking Coupless

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Référence bibliographique [11331]

Daspé, Marie-Ève, Sabourin, Stéphane, Péloquin, Katherine, Lussier, Yvan et Wright, John. 2013. «Curvilinear Associations Between Neuroticism and Dyadic Adjustment in Treatment-seeking Couples ». Journal of Family Psychology, vol. 27, no 2, p. 232-241.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of this study [is] to verify the existence of a curvilinear relationship between neuroticism and couple satisfaction.» (p. 234)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that very low as well as very high levels of neuroticism would lead to poorer dyadic adjustment, whereas moderate levels would lead to better adjustment, in both partners.» (p. 234)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample was composed of 472 heterosexual couples [from Montreal] seeking couple therapy.» (p. 234)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Les auteurs de l’étude aboutissent à quatre constats: «First, we found an inverted U-shaped relationship between neuroticism and dyadic adjustment. This curvilinear association was significant for both actor and partner effects. That is, neuroticism initially showed a positive association with dyadic adjustment, until an inflection point from which further increases in neuroticism predicted lower dyadic adjustment. […] Second, the curvilinear associations between neuroticism and dyadic adjustment were not moderated by gender. The test of distinguishability between dyad members showed that women and men in this sample were interchangeable, indicating no gender difference in the shape and magnitude of the relationship between neuroticism and self- and partner-reported dyadic adjustment. […] Third, we found significant actor and partner effects for openness to experience in the prediction of dyadic adjustment. Results suggest a positive association between an individual’s level of openness and both self- and partner-reported dyadic adjustment. […] Fourth, we found significant actor and partner effects for agreeableness, suggesting a positive association between this personality trait and dyadic adjustment.» (p. 237-238)