Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Workshop in a Multicultural, Impoverished Urban Area

Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Workshop in a Multicultural, Impoverished Urban Area

Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Workshop in a Multicultural, Impoverished Urban Area

Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Workshop in a Multicultural, Impoverished Urban Areas

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Référence bibliographique [11329]

Daigneault, Isabelle, Hebert, Martine, McDuff, Pierre et Frappier, Jean-Yves. 2012. «Evaluation of a Sexual Abuse Prevention Workshop in a Multicultural, Impoverished Urban Area ». Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, vol. 21, no 5, p. 521-542.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the present study was to overcome limits identified in the literature by evaluating gains in children’s knowledge of inappropriate touching and their abilities to recommend appropriate behavioral responses to an abusive situation soon after participating in the ESPACE sexual abuse prevention workshop with multicultural populations living in low socioeconomic urban areas. A second goal was to evaluate the ESPACE workshop over a longer follow-up period of two years. A third goal was to document implementation data and unintended negative effects using a more precise outcome: feelings of safety. Furthermore, the present study explores, as a fourth goal, the effects associated with three booster sessions.» (p. 524)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The study’s first hypothesis is that participants in the ESPACE prevention workshop will show greater knowledge of inappropriate touching and greater abilities to recommend appropriate behavioral responses to an abusive situation following the program compared with nonparticipants and that these gains will be maintained at a two-year follow-up. A second hypothesis is that for children in third and fourth grade, knowledge of inappropriate touching and abilities to recommend appropriate behavioral responses to an abusive situation of participants receiving a brief booster session (recall only—see workshop description for details) will be comparable to those participating in a complete booster of the ESPACE workshop and that both of these groups will show greater knowledge and abilities than those receiving no booster session. A third hypothesis is that, for children in fifth and sixth grade, knowledge of inappropriate touching and abilities to recommend appropriate behavioral responses to an abusive situation of participants receiving a comprehensive booster session (ESPACE + general violence prevention—see workshop description for details) will show greater gains than those receiving no booster session. A fourth hypothesis is that there will be no significant negative effect of the workshop at any time during the study.» (p. 524-525)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«There were 160 workshop participants (52% girls and 48% boys).» (p. 526)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


À la lumière de leur recherche, les auteurs constatent «a possible cultural difference between the values promoted in sexual abuse prevention workshops and the values promoted within certain ethnic communities. For example, values promoted in ESPACE (such as self-assertiveness) may conflict with the values promoted in the immigrant families that compose our sample, such as respect and deference toward elders and parents in Asian and Middle-Eastern families. This conflict may have posed an obstacle for learning new concepts or abilities that were contrary to parental values promoted in the home. In brief, although a basic cultural adaptation was made in hiring instructors from diverse ethnic backgrounds, cultural adaptations to the workshop content and structure might also be necessary with this population […] In addition, the cultural diversity and lower socioeconomic status of the sample used in the present study may have had an impact on the involvement of parents. ESPACE is one of the few prevention programs that offers workshops specifically designed for parents of children involved in prevention sessions. […] Parent participation was not formally assessed in the current study, but workshop instructors reported it to be low.» (p. 535-536)