Maternal Sensitivity and Children’s Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Duration

Maternal Sensitivity and Children’s Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Duration

Maternal Sensitivity and Children’s Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Duration

Maternal Sensitivity and Children’s Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Durations

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Référence bibliographique [11292]

Bordeleau, Stéphanie, Bernier, Annie et Carrier, Julie. 2012. «Maternal Sensitivity and Children’s Behavior Problems: Examining the Moderating Role of Infant Sleep Duration ». Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, vol. 41, no 4, p. 471-481.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The current study aimed to investigate whether the longitudinal associations between the quality of maternal behaviors during mother–infant interactions and child subsequent internalizing and externalizing symptomatology vary as a function of infant sleep duration.» (p. 473)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Fifty-five Caucasian mother–infant dyads (33 girls) living in a large Canadian metropolitan area participated in this study, taking part in two home visits: at 1 and 4 years of age.» (p. 473)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results provided support for the moderating role of infant nighttime sleep duration with respect to both externalizing and internalizing symptoms, indicating that maternal sensitivity was associated differently with child symptomatology according to sleep duration. Maternal sensitivity was negatively associated with both externalizing and internalizing symptomatology for children who slept more at night, whereas it was unrelated to symptomatology for children who slept less. In contrast, no significant interactions were noted using 24-hr sleep duration as a moderator (and in fact, the related regression coefficients were near-zero). Hence, the well-documented connection between higher quality parenting and lower child psychological difficulties was found only for infants getting more sleep, specifically during the night.» (p. 477)