Longitudinal Associations Between the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Children’s Sleep at Preschool Age

Longitudinal Associations Between the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Children’s Sleep at Preschool Age

Longitudinal Associations Between the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Children’s Sleep at Preschool Age

Longitudinal Associations Between the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Children’s Sleep at Preschool Ages

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Référence bibliographique [11291]

Bordeleau, Stéphanie, Bernier, Annie et Carrier, Julie. 2012. «Longitudinal Associations Between the Quality of Parent-Child Interactions and Children’s Sleep at Preschool Age ». Journal of Family Psychology, vol. 26, no 2, p. 254-262.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study set out to examine the prospective links between quality of mother -and father- child interactions and children’s subsequent sleep quality at preschool age […] To make progress in clarifying the developmental sequence, we also considered children’s sleep concurrent to parental behaviors. Drawing from recent recommendations (Erath & Tu, 2011), this study focused on three dimensions of maternal behavior: sensitivity, mind-mindedness, and autonomy support.» (p. 256)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Seventy mother child dyads (42 girls) living in a large Canadian metropolitan area participated in this study. For 41 of these families, the father came to our laboratory and was filmed during a free-play sequence with his child (25 girls).» (p. 256)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Overall, the results provided evidence for a longitudinal relation between parenting behaviors and a core indicator of sleep consolidation, that is, the percentage of nighttime sleep. Results indicated that maternal sensitivity, maternal mind-mindedness, maternal autonomy support, and the quality of father-child interactions in infancy were all significantly and positively associated with children’s percentage of nighttime sleep at preschool age. By contrast, none of these parenting behaviors were significantly related to total sleep duration on a 24-hr period. The results also suggested that, controlling for SES [socioeconomic status] and daycare attendance, the three dimensions of maternal behavior and the quality of father-child interactions all remained significantly or marginally associated with subsequent percentage of night-time sleep, but the multiple regression analysis indicated that none of the three dimensions of maternal behavior was uniquely related to child percentage of night-time sleep. […] Finally, a last regression analysis showed that the quality of mother-child and father-child interactions, combined, predicted a significant incremental portion of the variance in subsequent percentage of night-time sleep in children, above and beyond the covariates.» (p. 259)