Mothers, Fathers, and Toddlers: Parental Psychosocial Functioning as a Context for Young Children’s Sleep

Mothers, Fathers, and Toddlers: Parental Psychosocial Functioning as a Context for Young Children’s Sleep

Mothers, Fathers, and Toddlers: Parental Psychosocial Functioning as a Context for Young Children’s Sleep

Mothers, Fathers, and Toddlers: Parental Psychosocial Functioning as a Context for Young Children’s Sleeps

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Référence bibliographique [11280]

Bernier, Annie, Bélanger, Marie-Ève, Bordeleau, Stéphanie et Carrier, Julie. 2013. «Mothers, Fathers, and Toddlers: Parental Psychosocial Functioning as a Context for Young Children’s Sleep ». Developmental Psychology, vol. 49, no 7, p. 1375-1384.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The current study examined the relations between maternal and paternal psychosocial functioning when children were 15–18 months old and children’s sleep when they were 18 months and 2 years old.» (p. 1376)


2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Eighty-five intact two-parent families (37 boys and 48 girls) living in a large Canadian metropolitan area participated in this study. Families were recruited from birth lists randomly generated and provided to the research team by the Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services.» (p. 1377)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«These findings build on an emerging body of research and suggest that not only clinically significant difficulties but also normative variation in both mothers’ and fathers’ psychosocial functioning is related to young children’s ability to have longer uninterrupted periods of sleep, one of the central indicators of sleep consolidation in toddlerhood. Sleep scholars have often noted that the direction of associations between child sleep and family factors was unclear (Keller & El-Sheikh, 2011; Meltzer & Mindell, 2007). Although the current design does not allow for firm demonstration of the direction of associations as would experimental or cross-lagged designs (e.g., Keller & El-Sheikh, 2011), the results provide some suggestion in this regard. While not ruling out bidirectional effects (which in fact are likely; see Kelly & El-Sheikh, 2011), the findings suggest that at least some of the associations are probably due to family processes influencing children’s sleep. How, precisely, parental psychosocial functioning may impact young children’s sleep consolidation remains a matter for further investigation.» (p. 1380)