Social Inequalities in Health in Montréal Progress to Date: 2011 report of the Director of Public Health

Social Inequalities in Health in Montréal Progress to Date: 2011 report of the Director of Public Health

Social Inequalities in Health in Montréal Progress to Date: 2011 report of the Director of Public Health

Social Inequalities in Health in Montréal Progress to Date: 2011 report of the Director of Public Healths

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Référence bibliographique [11094]

Raynault, Marie-France et Léa Roback Research Centre. 2012. Social Inequalities in Health in Montréal Progress to Date: 2011 report of the Director of Public Health. Montréal: Gouvernement du Québec, Direction de la santé publique, Agence de la santé et des services sociaux de Montréal.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This synthesis report will help you understand why we chose the theme of social inequalities in health and the recommendations I have addressed to the different levels of government.» (résumé)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«The mixed results reflect, on one hand, growing income inequality in Canada and, on the other, the positive effects of Québec’s social policies, particularly those related to families. These social investments are starting to pay off […] Households with incomes below the market basket measure threshold face significant health risks: it has been demonstrated that these families cannot devote an appropriate share of their budget to healthy foods. In most cases, the cause is not lack of knowledge about nutrition (which could be remedied by a health education program) but rather lack of money, as evidenced by the dramatic increase in use of food banks in Montréal […] CPE have proven not only to increase the number of women in the labour force in Québec—which helps increase family incomes—but also to reduce social inequalities in child development. [T]he Director of public health recommends that various levels of government increase the geographical access and number of places in government-funded childcare centres in deprived neighbourhoods and broaden the economic accessibility of low-income families. He also recommends that we seek to enhance understanding of the main determinants for childcare attendance by low-income children.» (p. 23-24)