Polyvictimization in a Child Welfare Sample of Children and Youths

Polyvictimization in a Child Welfare Sample of Children and Youths

Polyvictimization in a Child Welfare Sample of Children and Youths

Polyvictimization in a Child Welfare Sample of Children and Youthss

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Référence bibliographique [10997]

Cyr, Katie, Chamberland, Claire, Lessard, Geneviève, Clément, Marie-Ève, Wemmers, Jo-Anne, Collin-Vézina, Delphine, Gagné, Marie-Hélène et Damant, Dominique. 2012. «Polyvictimization in a Child Welfare Sample of Children and Youths ». Psychology of Violence, vol. 2, no 4, p. 385-400.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The current study wants to extend research on multiple victimization by documenting simultaneously different types of victimizations in a sample of child welfare children.» (p. 386)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The final sample includes 220 children aged 2 to 17 years comprising approximately the same number of girls and boys. At the time of the interviews, the majority of children were living with their mothers (30%), in foster homes (22%), or in reception centers (20%). Only 11%
lived with two parents, a minority (6%) lived with their father, and the remainder lived alone or with a relative (grandparent, aunt, adult sibling).» (p. 387)

Instruments :
Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (JVQ)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Many children experienced a high number of victimizations in 1 year, and child welfare children in Quebec are particularly affected by polyvictimization. [...] The results reveal a significantly higher prevalence of polyvictimization among this group compared to the U.S. youth population. Our results show that polyvictimization increases with the age of the child, adolescents being the most affected. » (p. 394) «Almost two thirds (66%) of the sample were exposed to violence, the most common forms being witness to assault without weapon (51%)
or with weapon (25%), in which both the offender and the victim are rarely a family member. Past-year exposure to intrafamilial violence was experienced by 16% of the young people in the form of domestic violence (9%) or witness to physical abuse by a parent toward a sibling (7%). These forms of exposure are rather chronic because 47% of young people exposed to domestic violence witnessed more than one event, with the percentage increasing to 53% for witnessing physical abuse toward a sibling.» (p. 393)