Religious Diversity in Quebec, Real and Imagined, Visible and Invisible

Religious Diversity in Quebec, Real and Imagined, Visible and Invisible

Religious Diversity in Quebec, Real and Imagined, Visible and Invisible

Religious Diversity in Quebec, Real and Imagined, Visible and Invisibles

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Référence bibliographique [10912]

Mossière, Géraldine et Meintel, Deirde. 2013. «Religious Diversity in Quebec, Real and Imagined, Visible and Invisible ». Diversité canadienne / Canadian Diversity, vol. 10, no 1, p. 49-53

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Our research, done in collaboration with five other researchers, aims at documenting: 1) the new religious diversity that appeared in Quebec over the last decades; 2) the meaning of religion in the everyday lives of the Québécois today.» (p. 49)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«[O]bservations have been completed on a total of 100 groups in Montreal (out of a total of 137 to date). Of the Montreal groups, 38 have been studied in-depth through extended participant observation and interviews with members and leaders.» (p. 49)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Overall, we find many instances where religious practices have been adapted to the conditions in Quebec: although the prohibition on paying interest makes it nearly impossible for Muslims to acquire a home in Quebec, the imam of a mosque in our study suggested that his followers respect the spirit of the rule rather than the rule itself, that is, the principle that wealthy people should not abuse the poor by imposing usurious rates of interest. On the individual level, we find considerable religious change over the life course, for example, in how religion is practiced and the intensity of religious practice. […] The main divergences with the host society revolve around differing interpretations of family models. For example, Tamil Catholics wish that Quebec society would provide better examples for young people; they see a causal relationship between the low levels of religious practice among the Québécois and the breakdown of family structures, as expressed in high rates of divorce, cohabitation without marriage, single-parent families and children born out of wedlock. Tamil priests often point proudly to the low divorce rate among their members.» (p. 51)