Health of Migrants with Precarious Status: Results of an Exploratory Study in Montreal-Part B

Health of Migrants with Precarious Status: Results of an Exploratory Study in Montreal-Part B

Health of Migrants with Precarious Status: Results of an Exploratory Study in Montreal-Part B

Health of Migrants with Precarious Status: Results of an Exploratory Study in Montreal-Part Bs

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Référence bibliographique [10911]

Brabant, Zoé et Raynault, Marie-France. 2012. «Health of Migrants with Precarious Status: Results of an Exploratory Study in Montreal-Part B ». Social Work in Public Health, vol. 27, no 5, p. 469-481.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article presents the results of a preliminary study aimed at exploring the similarities between Canada and other countries in the living conditions and health of MPS [migrants with precarious migration status].» (p. 470)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The study is based on 24 «[…] interviews with those [in Montreal] who help these migrants: researchers, members of community organizations, caregivers, interveners, representatives of official organizations, and so on.» (p. 470)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[t]he interviews with various key informants working directly or indirectly with MPS in Montreal point out that these migrants face a multitude of health inequalities. Moreover, as it is the case for several underprivileged populations, these barriers to health often accumulate and mutually interact […], and some data already indicate the importance of this population in Canada […]. Even if the situation of MPS in Canada is poorly documented, it may be very similar to their situation in other countries.(p. 477-478) Note that «a very large number of informants mentioned that family reunification could have a major impact on the mental health of MPS. For reasons of security, financial means, a hasty departure, […] many of them, on arrival, have left a spouse and children behind. Before, during, and after this separation, there are major psychological and social consequences not only for the MPS but also for those who remain in their country of origin. […] Several informants also noted the extra vulnerability of women sponsored by their spouses, for such women sometimes have to endure unbearable situations, including domestic violence, for fear of being sent back to the country of origin. As well, conjugal violence seems disproportionally to affect women of precarious status, no matter what their migration status.» (p. 474)