The Remote Networked School model: An ICT Initiative to Keep Small Rural Schools and Their Local Community Alive

The Remote Networked School model: An ICT Initiative to Keep Small Rural Schools and Their Local Community Alive

The Remote Networked School model: An ICT Initiative to Keep Small Rural Schools and Their Local Community Alive

The Remote Networked School model: An ICT Initiative to Keep Small Rural Schools and Their Local Community Alives

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Référence bibliographique [10832]

Allaire, Stéphanie, Bikie, Nadège, Laferrière, Thérèse, Gagnon, Vincent, Hamel, Christine, Labonté-Hubert, Émilie et Deslandes, Rollande. 2011. «The Remote Networked School model: An ICT Initiative to Keep Small Rural Schools and Their Local Community Alive ». International Journal about Parents in Education, vol. 5, no 2, p. 123-133.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The importance of peer interaction for learning purposes is a well-known fact in educational theory, and a school of a small size is particularly challenged to engage same-age students in social exchange of this nature. For almost a decade, an action research partnership (Laferrière & Breuleux, 2002) has been established. [...] The model that was cocreated was meant to enrich interactions for learning purposes in rural schools. More concretely, with the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs), we designed a model whose purpose is to bring classrooms of different schools and regions to work and learn together. This paper focuses on two poles of results of the Remote Networked School (RNS) model: 1) the advantages of collaboration between schools from teachers’ point of view; 2) parents’ social representations of the RNS model and its value as it pertains to their children’s education.» (p. 123)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«How do parents perceive the RNS, and what do they expect from it? How do they participate in the academic life of their children enrolled in an RNS school? What are the roles that parents play? What are their responsibilities? What do they do to support the RNS in their community? In other words, what are the social representations that these parents have of the RNS? It is these questions that this paper addresses in addition to the teachers’ point of view about school collaboration promoted by the RNS model.» (p. 123)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«To report on the first pole, we focused on teachers, their sense of isolation and their own professional development experience within the RNS initiative. Over two hundred teachers or so had responded to questionnaires over the years, and at least 80 of them in a recurring manner. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with about 30 of these teachers. [...] Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 parents, of which 5 were interviewed during phase 1 of the RNS initiative, and 7 during phase 5.» (p. 123-124)

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Teachers mainly recognize that it has contributed to the reduction of their feeling of isolation. They see that this model is pedagogically effective with their students. Moreover, the initiative has shown the sustainability of professional collaboration and the emergence of a collaborative culture. Although most parents do not participate actively in the RNS activities, they are aware of the model, and agree to the gathering of data regarding their child(ren) who is/are part of it. This is, in itself, a manifestation of openness to change. [...] Moreover, the very fact for a child of having the feeling that his/her parents support what’s going on in school can have a positive impact on his/her relationship to school. However, it is striking how parents see the value of the RNS in its social aspects rather than its academic one. They are pleased that their child(ren) have more friends and the like. Deeper understanding is recognized by only very few parents. Nonetheless, the fact that no parent interviewed in phase 5 shared a worry about seeing teachers being replaced by ICTs, in comparison to what they expressed during phase 1, is found positive.» (p. 129)