Family, School and Friends: Correlates of Canadian Youth Outcomes

Family, School and Friends: Correlates of Canadian Youth Outcomes

Family, School and Friends: Correlates of Canadian Youth Outcomes

Family, School and Friends: Correlates of Canadian Youth Outcomess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [10799]

Zhang, Lihui. 2011. «Family, School and Friends: Correlates of Canadian Youth Outcomes ». Child Indicators Research, vol. 4, no 3, p. 467-498.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Given that going to school is a major component of most youth’s everyday life, and often also a common location of many juvenile criminal activities, the determination of youth school outcomes is inseparable from that of their criminal behaviour. Thus, this paper empirically investigates the joint correlates of Canadian youth academic and criminal outcomes». (p. 468)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The question is then: how are youth outcomes determined?» (p. 468)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The main data sets employed by this study are the masterfile of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) and 2001 Census. [...] The NLSCY is an ongoing survey of Canadian children and youth designed to follow their development and well-being from birth to early adulthood.» (p. 472)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«At school level, ’cooperation’ through in-class group activities is highly correlated with better school outcomes and decreased levels of criminal activities for both boys and girls. More conventional measures of school quality, such as the type of school, class size, and teacher’s education attainment fall short compared to this group activity variable. [...] Echoing the findings in the Canadian children’s outcome literature [...], a number of important correlates are identified at personal and family level: (i) Parental education is strongly correlated with better school outcomes for boys and girls, but not correlated with criminal activities; (ii) Household income is found to be moderately related to boys’ and girls’ school outcomes, though not as important for their participation in criminal activities; (iii) Parental supervision is associated with both better school outcomes and fewer criminal activities for both boys and girls and the effects are large; (iv) Strong peer effect is present for both boys and girls, and is important for both school outcomes and criminal outcomes; and (v) Exposure to media violence is connected to moderately increased level of violent crime for boys.» (p. 493)