Interpersonal Functioning in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Developmental Antecedents and Relationship to Cortisol Levels

Interpersonal Functioning in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Developmental Antecedents and Relationship to Cortisol Levels

Interpersonal Functioning in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Developmental Antecedents and Relationship to Cortisol Levels

Interpersonal Functioning in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Developmental Antecedents and Relationship to Cortisol Levelss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [10620]

Ostiguy, Caroline. 2011. «Interpersonal Functioning in the Offspring of Parents with Bipolar Disorder: Developmental Antecedents and Relationship to Cortisol Levels». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of this dissertation was to examine longitudinal predictors and biological correlates of interpersonal functioning in the OBD [offspring of parents with bipolar disorder]. Interpersonal functioning is an important concept in developmental psychopathology, and it has been found to predict the development of affective disorders (e.g, Eberhart & Hammen, 2006). In the first study, I examined the impact of parents’ neuroticism on behavioural problems during childhood and interpersonal functioning in late adolescence/early adulthood.» (p. 26)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The present study tested three hypotheses. First, based on our previous findings (Ellenbogen & Hodgins, 2004), we hypothesized that high neuroticism in parents, assessed when offspring were children, would predict interpersonal dysfunction in the offspring in late adolescence-early adulthood. [...] Second, we hypothesized that the association between parents’ neuroticism and offspring interpersonal functioning would be partly mediated by offspring internalizing and externalizing problems in middle childhood. [...] Third, [...] we hypothesized that the association between parents’ neuroticism and offspring’s functioning in late adolescence-early adulthood would be stronger among the OBD than the OFH-[offspring without a family history of bipolar disorder].» (p. 32)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample included 62 male and 62 female offspring, from 78 families, who were participating in an ongoing prospective study of families with a parent diagnosed with BD or parents with no mental disorder.[...] In the present follow-up study, the offspring ranged in age from 15 to 27 years (M =19.81; SD = 3.01; see Table 1). Sixty-five offspring, from 44 families, had a parent with BD, and 59 offspring, from 34 families, had parents with no mental disorder.» (p. 34-35)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«First, the hypothesis that parents’ neuroticism would predict interpersonal functioning in offspring was supported, even after controlling for the offspring’s age, gender, and current disorders. [...] Our second hypothesis was that the association between parents’ neuroticism and interpersonal functioning in offspring would be mediated in part by offspring’s childhood internalizing and externalizing problems. While the hypothesis was supported, the mediation through childhood internalizing problems was modest while that of externalizing problems was stronger. [...] Our third hypothesis, that parents’ neuroticism would be more strongly associated with interpersonal functioning among the OBD than the OFH-, and that the mediation of offspring childhood problems would be stronger in high-risk than low-risk families, was partially supported. Despite the small sample size, the diagnosis of BD in parents moderated the association between parents’ neuroticism and childhood internalizing problems among offspring, but not the association between childhood internalizing problems and interpersonal functioning a decade later. [...] In sum, the results suggest a pattern of relative continuity across generations in families having a parent with BD, but not in non-affected families, defined by a trajectory of high emotionality in parents, offspring internalizing
problems in childhood, and interpersonal dysfunction in late adolescence and early adulthood.» (p. 48-49)