Mutual Touch during Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Still-Face Interactions: Influences of Interaction Period and Infant Birth Status

Mutual Touch during Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Still-Face Interactions: Influences of Interaction Period and Infant Birth Status

Mutual Touch during Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Still-Face Interactions: Influences of Interaction Period and Infant Birth Status

Mutual Touch during Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Still-Face Interactions: Influences of Interaction Period and Infant Birth Statuss

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Référence bibliographique [10593]

Mantis, Irene. 2012. «Mutual Touch during Mother-Infant Face-to-Face Still-Face Interactions: Influences of Interaction Period and Infant Birth Status». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de psychologie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Objectives were to examine: (1) how the quantitative and qualitative aspects of touch employed by mothers and their infants varied across the normal periods of the still-face (SF) procedure and how these were associated with risk status, and (2) the association between co-touch and the quality of the mother-child relationship.» (p. iii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The final sample consisted of three groups of 5½ -month-old full-term (n = 40) infants, VLBW [very low birth weight]/preterm (n = 40) infants, and infants at psychosocial risk (n = 41) and their mothers drawn from a longitudinal project. All dyads were tested in their homes when infants reached 5½ months of age.» (p. 10)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Consistent with the literature, while the SF period did not negatively affect the amount of mutual touch engaged in for mothers and their full-term infants and mothers and their infants at psychosocial risk, it did for mothers and their VLBW/preterm infants. Together, results illuminate how both mothers and infants participate in shaping and co-regulating their interactions through the use of touch and underscore the contribution of examining the impact of birth status on mutual touch.» (p. iii) «The second objective was to examine the association between mutual touch and the quality of the mother-child relationship (i.e., measured via the Emotional Availability Scales). Mothers with childhood histories of aggression and social withdrawal who showed higher levels of sensitivity, engaged in more “no touch” in the reunion-normal period. Although this is contrary to what was expected, it may be the case that infants were making their mothers appear more sensitive than they were in the normal period (e.g., infants who were more involved in the interaction; infants with a greater ability to draw their mother in).» (p. 44)