Clinical Severity and Familial Risk in Mood Disorders

Clinical Severity and Familial Risk in Mood Disorders

Clinical Severity and Familial Risk in Mood Disorders

Clinical Severity and Familial Risk in Mood Disorderss

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Référence bibliographique [10539]

Doran, Pamela. 2012. «Clinical Severity and Familial Risk in Mood Disorders». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de psychiatrie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
La présente thèse poursuit trois objectifs qui visent à mieux comprendre le rôle de la famille dans le développement d’un trouble de l’humeur. First, «[w]e will compare mood disorder subjects with and without a family history of any psychiatric disorder on sociodemographic characteristics including: (1) age, (2) gender, (3) place of birth, (4) maternal language, (5) marital status, (6) education, (7) employment, and (8) living situation. [Second,] [w]e will compare mood disorder subjects with and without a family history of any psychiatric disorder on clinical severity indicators including: (1) age of first psychiatric consultation, (2) number of lifetime psychiatric hospitalizations, and (3) number of suicide attempts. [Third, we] will report alternative and complementary ways to describe familial exposures using detailed, self-reported family history information. We will then examine the associations between these familial exposure variables and clinical severity indicators.» (p. 23-24)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Information was gathered from the Mood Disorders Program (MDP), a tertiary-care, outpatient psychiatry facility at the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC) in Montreal, Quebec.» (p. 25) «Subjects were 378 outpatients with a current DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD [major depressive disorder] (N=139) or BP [bipolar disorder] (N=239).» (p. 4)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Mood disorder subjects with physician-reported family history were primarily Canadian born and English speaking, and subjects without such a history were mostly unemployed. In terms of clinical characteristics, BP subjects with physician-reported family history sought psychiatric assistance at a younger age and MDD subjects without such a history were hospitalized more often. Consistent with prior research, BP subjects demonstrated more familial loading of both BP and schizophrenia/psychosis compared to MDD subjects. Furthermore, a family history of schizophrenia/psychosis and drug problems were associated with more frequent hospitalizations. Finally, a family history of drug and alcohol problems as well as living with two or more acutely ill family members, were associated with more lifetime suicide attempts.» (p. 4-5)