Child Contribution to Agricultural Household Income

Child Contribution to Agricultural Household Income

Child Contribution to Agricultural Household Income

Child Contribution to Agricultural Household Incomes

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Référence bibliographique [10514]

Brassard, David-Alexandre. 2012. «Child Contribution to Agricultural Household Income». Mémoire de maîtrise, Québec, Université Laval, Département d’économique.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this research is to determine the value of child work in self-employed agriculture.» (p. 4)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The empirical estimation of children shadow wages uses the Ugandan National household survey (UNHS) of 2005-2006. The survey collected information on close to 7400 representative households with multiple questionnaires capturing household characteristics, agricultural practices and community data.» (p. 21)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Even though child labor can be a substantial part of an agricultural economy, their efforts are rarely acknowledged. Quantitative measures of their contribution can bring into focus the importance of children in household income. Overall, children’s productivity is 25% of adult labor, which corresponds to 0.34 US $ PPP per hour. However, children play a larger role in domestic labor inside the household. The total value of their labor is estimated to be 10 percent of household’s domestic work compared to the 4.2 percent of agricultural production asssociated [sic] to child labor. Overall, the contribution of children to household income is undeniable. Furthermore, the measures obtained show the need for incentives to modify household behavior and the welfare cost of measures such as banning child labor. The first-difference model yields robust estimates of the labor elasticity of household production in the presence of endogenous input choices. In addition, it offers an alternative to instrumental variables, which are questionnable[sic].» (p. 44-45)