Women Who Jump into Wells: Reflections on Suicidality in Women from Conflict Regions of the Indian Subcontinent

Women Who Jump into Wells: Reflections on Suicidality in Women from Conflict Regions of the Indian Subcontinent

Women Who Jump into Wells: Reflections on Suicidality in Women from Conflict Regions of the Indian Subcontinent

Women Who Jump into Wells: Reflections on Suicidality in Women from Conflict Regions of the Indian Subcontinents

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Référence bibliographique [10418]

Guzder, Jaswant. 2011. «Women Who Jump into Wells: Reflections on Suicidality in Women from Conflict Regions of the Indian Subcontinent ». Transcultural Psychiatry, vol. 48, no 5, p. 585-603.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper examines narratives of women from the Indian subcontinent, including Canadian refugee claimants, emerging from the conflict regions of Pakistan, Punjab, Bangladesh, and Sri Lanka, who have presented suicidal ideation or attempts or died by suicide.» (p. 585)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«I have used four case histories from patients of the Cultural Consultation Service (CCS) [of McGill University] and narratives from other sources to illustrate the challenges to treating suicidal women from regions of war and conflict of the Indian subcontinent.» (p. 600)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


According to the author, «[t]he focus on mother–child survival and bonding appeared to be a universal strategy motivating their mastery of suicidal intent, though their children suffered multiple strains during their grieving process. At times it appeared easier for these women to identify with female rather than with male children, though traditionally male children are highly valued in the culture as future protectors. In this regard, the women had not been protected by male providers, either because of cultural paradigms or circumstances of loss, civil upheaval, migration, or domestic violence. The continued silencing of women living in traditional gendered hierarchies can be seen as a pull of divided loyalties with high social and individual cot for these women when they are dislocated from the group or family supports. Suicide appears to be a solution to the anomie of their dislocation, loss of social capital, and the shattering of social identity and internalized ego ideals. Conflict resolution or peace-building strategies within the social context of these women would need to recognize the multiple levels of systemic conflict, the powerful leverage of silence and the limited scope of social defiance in these closed systems.» (p. 600-601)