Food Insecurity: Could School Food Supplementation Help Break Cycles of Intergenerational Transmission of Social Inequalities?

Food Insecurity: Could School Food Supplementation Help Break Cycles of Intergenerational Transmission of Social Inequalities?

Food Insecurity: Could School Food Supplementation Help Break Cycles of Intergenerational Transmission of Social Inequalities?

Food Insecurity: Could School Food Supplementation Help Break Cycles of Intergenerational Transmission of Social Inequalities?s

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Référence bibliographique [10389]

Roustit, Christelle, Hamelin, Anne-Marie, Grillo, Francesca, Martin, Judith et Chauvin, Pierre. 2010. «Food Insecurity: Could School Food Supplementation Help Break Cycles of Intergenerational Transmission of Social Inequalities? ». Pediatrics, vol. 126, no 6, p. 1174-1181.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he objective of our study was to determine whether food assistance in high schools had a moderating effect on the association between food insecurity and scholastic difficulties for adolescents.» (p. 1175)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study used data from the Social and Health Survey of Quebec Children and Adolescents, which was conducted in 1999 by the Quebec Statistics Institute. […] The present study focused on the adolescent population and included 2346 students 13 or 16 years of age (and 1983 of their parents), from 52 and 61 schools, respectively.» (p. 1175)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our study corroborates the association between poverty and household food insecurity in a school population survey in Quebec. It also substantiates the association between food insecurity and poor academic achievement for adolescents. Food insecurity can constitute a pathway between poverty and scholastic performance. As neurodevelopmental outcomes in children, cognitive efficiency and academic achievement are considered criteria of developmental health and are likely to reflect social health inequalities in children. Because academic achievement is one of the cornerstones for escaping from the heritage of poverty, the effect of social disparities in such achievement could be the intergenerational transmission of poverty and, as a result, social inequalities and consequently social health inequalities. Indeed, parental education levels lead to social inequalities in economic resources, which are associated with poor family health outcomes. In the present study, the lower the parental (or maternal) level of education was, the higher the risk of low household income or of food insecurity was. According to the material perspective, material deprivation leads to detrimental outcomes in terms of food security, education, and leisure spending, all of which contribute to children’s well-being. Therefore, socioeconomic disadvantages compromise children’s life trajectories and, later, young adults’ psychosocial adjustment. Moreover, the intergenerational transmission of poverty has unfavorable effects on health, both objective and subjective, because of unhealthy lifestyle factors, unequal access to and quality of health care, and a more-stressful psychosocial environment.» (p. 1178-1179)