Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster Increases Risk for Obesity in 51/2-Year-Old Children

Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster Increases Risk for Obesity in 51/2-Year-Old Children

Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster Increases Risk for Obesity in 51/2-Year-Old Children

Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster Increases Risk for Obesity in 51/2-Year-Old Childrens

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Référence bibliographique [10388]

Dancause, Kelsey Needham, Laplante, David P., Fraser, Sarah, Brunet, Alain, Ciampi, Antonio, Schmitz, Norbert et King, Suzanne. 2012. «Prenatal Exposure to a Natural Disaster Increases Risk for Obesity in 51/2-Year-Old Children ». Pediatric Research, vol. 71, no 1, p. 126-131.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Our objective was to determine the extent to which exposure to PNMS due to the ice storm was associated with obesity risk among 5½ year-old children.» (p. 5)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that PNMS [prenatal maternal stress] would predict obesity risk independently of the children’s birth characteristics, maternal characteristics, and other risk factors.» (p. 5)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants included 111 women who were pregnant during the January 1998 Québec Ice Storm or who conceived within the following three months, and their children.» (p. 2)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«An adverse environment in utero, including exposure to prenatal maternal stress (PNMS), can result in poor birth outcomes such as low birth weight, which increases risk of later cardiometabolic diseases such as hypertension and obesity. It is unclear to what extent PNMS influences obesity risk independently of its impact on birth characteristics, especially among humans. [...] Eight children with high objective PNMS exposure (14.5%) were obese compared to one child (1.8%) with low exposure (p=0.02). Objective PNMS increased obesity risk (Model 1 p=0.02, OR=1.37) after controlling for other potential risk factors, suggesting that PNMS might be a factor in the development of childhood obesity.» (p. 2)