Mothers’ Experiences of a Touch and Talk Nursing Intervention to Optimise Pain Management in the PICU: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

Mothers’ Experiences of a Touch and Talk Nursing Intervention to Optimise Pain Management in the PICU: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

Mothers’ Experiences of a Touch and Talk Nursing Intervention to Optimise Pain Management in the PICU: A Qualitative Descriptive Study

Mothers’ Experiences of a Touch and Talk Nursing Intervention to Optimise Pain Management in the PICU: A Qualitative Descriptive Studys

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Référence bibliographique [10387]

Rennick, Janet E., Lambert, Sylvie, Childerhose, Janet, Campbell-Yeo, Marsha, Filion, Françoise et Johnston, Celeste C. 2011. «Mothers’ Experiences of a Touch and Talk Nursing Intervention to Optimise Pain Management in the PICU: A Qualitative Descriptive Study ». Intensive and Critical Care Nursing, vol. 27, no 3, p. 151-157.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objectives of this study were to describe (a) how mothers experienced their involvement in their children’s PICU care through the T&T intervention and (b) whether mothers would participate in this kind of intervention again.» (p. 153)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Sixty-five English and French-speaking mothers were recruited using convenience sampling.» (p. 153) in three Canadian PICUs.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Increasingly, the active participation of parents in the care of their child during hospitalisation in the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is advocated as a central component of family centred care (Just, 2005) and a critical strategy in facilitating child and parent coping (Diaz-Caneja et al., 2005; Melnyk et al., 2004). Parental involvement fosters family normalcy, integrity and relationships in a time of high anxiety and uncertainty (Rennick, 1995; Tomlinson et al., 1999). [...] Despite the potential value of active parent participation in care, few researchers have capitalised on parental presence when designing PICU intervention studies.» (p. 152) «This study is the first to describe the experiences of mothers taught to use a T&T intervention with their children undergoing painful PICU procedures. Findings demonstrate that mothers were not overwhelmed by participating in a PICU comfort intervention. In fact, most were willing participants who welcomed the opportunity to comfort their child during an invasive procedure. Giving parents the choice of being involved in their child’s care using touch and distraction techniques during painful procedures can provide them with the opportunity to parent their child, and a sense of having helped their child during a difficult PICU experience.» (p. 156)