Larger Amygdala but no Change in Hippocampal Volume in 10-Year-Old Children Exposed to Maternal Depressive Symptomatology since Birth

Larger Amygdala but no Change in Hippocampal Volume in 10-Year-Old Children Exposed to Maternal Depressive Symptomatology since Birth

Larger Amygdala but no Change in Hippocampal Volume in 10-Year-Old Children Exposed to Maternal Depressive Symptomatology since Birth

Larger Amygdala but no Change in Hippocampal Volume in 10-Year-Old Children Exposed to Maternal Depressive Symptomatology since Births

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Référence bibliographique [10376]

Lupien, Sonia J., Parent, Sophie, Evans, Alan C., Tremblay, Richard E., Zelazo, Philip David, Corbo, Vincent, Pruessner, Jens C. et Séguin, Jean R. 2011. «Larger Amygdala but no Change in Hippocampal Volume in 10-Year-Old Children Exposed to Maternal Depressive Symptomatology since Birth ». Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, vol. 108, no 34, p. 1-6.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors want «[t]o determine if poor maternal care associated with maternal depressive symptomatology has a similar pattern of association to the volumes of the hippocampus and amygdala in children [...].» (p. 1)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample of this study is composed of 38 children born in 1996 selected from a ongoing Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development. «Two-way repeated-measure ANOVAs were performed on amygdala and hippocampal volumes using MDS group and sex as the between-subject factors and hemisphere (left versus right volume) as the within-subject factor. [And] a two-way repeated-measure ANOVA was performed on salivary glucocorticoid levels using MDS group and sex as the
between-subject factors, time (arrival versus prescan versus postscan) as the within-subject factor, and time of sampling as a covariate.» (p. 2)

Type de traitement des données :
Anlayse statistique

3. Résumé


«Maternal separation and poor maternal care in animals have been shown to have important effects on the developing hippocampus and amygdala. In humans, children exposed to abuse/maltreatment or orphanage rearing do not present changes in hippocampal volumes. However, children reared in orphanages present enlarged amygdala volumes, suggesting that the amygdala may be particularly sensitive to severely disturbed (i.e., discontinous, neglectful) care in infancy. Maternal depressive symptomatology has been associated with reductions in overall sensitivity to the infant, and with an increased rate of withdrawn, disengaged behaviors. [...] Results revealed no group difference in hippocampal volumes, but larger left and right amygdala volumes and increased levels of glucocorticoids in the children of mothers presenting depressive symptomatology since birth. Moreover, a significant positive correlation was observed between mothers’ mean depressive scores and amygdale volumes in their children. The results of this study suggest that amygdala volume in human children may represent an early marker of biological sensitivity to quality of maternal care.» (p. 1)