Perceived Early-Life Maternal Care and the Cortisol Response to Repeated Psychosocial Stress

Perceived Early-Life Maternal Care and the Cortisol Response to Repeated Psychosocial Stress

Perceived Early-Life Maternal Care and the Cortisol Response to Repeated Psychosocial Stress

Perceived Early-Life Maternal Care and the Cortisol Response to Repeated Psychosocial Stresss

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Référence bibliographique [10362]

Engert, Veronika, Efanov, Simona I., Dedovic, Katarina, Duchesne, Annie, Dagher, Alain et Pruessner, Jens C. 2010. «Perceived Early-Life Maternal Care and the Cortisol Response to Repeated Psychosocial Stress ». Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience, vol. 35, no 6, p. 370-377.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In the current study, we investigated the influence of early life maternal care on single and repeated TSST [Trier Social Stress Test] exposure.» (p. 971)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«[W]e expected the low maternal care group to show a continuously high cortisol response upon repeated stress exposure.» (p. 371)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon se compose de 63 jeunes adultes âgés entre 18 et 30 ans recrutés à partir d’un babillard électronique du site internet de l’Université McGill.

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In the past decade, a body of animal and human research has revealed a profound influence of early-life experiences, ranging from variations in parenting behaviour to severe adversity, on hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis regulation in adulthood. In our own previous studies, we have shown how variations in early-life parental care influence the development of the hippocampus and modify the cortisol awakening response. [...] Controlling for the effect of sex, we found an inverted u-shaped relation between increasing levels of maternal care and cortisol stress responsivity. Specifically, overall and stress-induced cortisol levels went from below normal in the low maternal care, to normal in the medium care, back to below normal in the high maternal care groups. We found no group differences with respect to heart rate and subjective psychological stress measures. Whereas low and high maternal care groups exhibited similarly low endocrine stress responses, their psychological profiles were opposed with increased levels of depression and anxiety and decreased self-esteem in the low care group. [...] We discuss the potential significance of this dissociation between endocrine and psychological parameters with respect to stress vulnerability and resistance for each maternal care group.» (p. 370)
Note : Le stress intra et extra familial pendant l’enfance et l’adolescence est analysé dans l’article.