Preliminary Findings from a Study of First-Episode Psychosis in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of Outcomes

Preliminary Findings from a Study of First-Episode Psychosis in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of Outcomes

Preliminary Findings from a Study of First-Episode Psychosis in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of Outcomes

Preliminary Findings from a Study of First-Episode Psychosis in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of Outcomess

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Référence bibliographique [10355]

Iyer, Srividya. N., Mangala, Ramamurti, Thara, Rangaswamy et Malla, Ashok K. 2010. «Preliminary Findings from a Study of First-Episode Psychosis in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India: Comparison of Outcomes ». Schizophrenia Research, vol. 121, no 1-3, p. 227-233.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of this study was therefore to examine whether one year clinical and functional outcomes of FEP [first-episode psychosis] patients, with little or no previous treatment experience, varied across two similar treatment programs in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India.» (p. 228)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Based on previous research, we hypothesized that outcomes would be better in India than in Canada.» (p. 228)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This article reports preliminary findings from an ongoing multi-year investigation of FEP in Montreal, Canada and Chennai, India. Using identical protocols of recruitment and treatment, the study involves the collection of extensive prospective data on symptoms, cognition, quality of life, pathways to care, and the role of families.» (p. 228) 61 patients in Chennai, India and 88 patients in Montreal, Canada were evaluated.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«That schizophrenia has a better prognosis in ‘developing’ than in ‘developed’ countries has been suggested to be “the single most important finding of cultural differences in cross-cultural research on mental health” (Lin and Kleinman, 1988).» (p. 227) «Based on the two findings that outcomes tend to be determined early in the course of psychosis and better in certain sociocultural contexts, one can infer that differences in outcome trajectories manifest themselves early on. This inference, however, remains to be examined systematically.» «Our most significant results pertain to the differences in outcomes between the two sites. [...] Despite this, the rate of service engagement over the one year course of treatment was much lower at the Canadian site. Whether or not a family member is involved in treatment is a strong predictor of service engagement in specialized early intervention programs (Conus et al., 2010; Schimmelmann et al., 2006). In India, families of persons with psychosis are generally extremely involved in all aspects of treatment from help seeking to engagement and treatment adherence (Nunley, 1998; Srinivasan and Thara, 2002). Thus, it can be hypothesized that differences in the degree and nature of family involvement mediate the inters-site difference in service engagement rates.» (p. 230-231)