Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words? Testing Two Versions of the Pictoral Infant Communication Scale

Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words? Testing Two Versions of the Pictoral Infant Communication Scale

Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words? Testing Two Versions of the Pictoral Infant Communication Scale

Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words? Testing Two Versions of the Pictoral Infant Communication Scales

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Référence bibliographique [10295]

Matejka, Anna Grivas. 2009. «Are Pictures Worth a Thousand Words? Testing Two Versions of the Pictoral Infant Communication Scale». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de psychoéducation.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The primary purpose of the present study was to determine if the pictures on the PICS [Pictoral Infant Communication Scale] actually help parents to understand the items on the measure, by comparing the version of the PICS with pictures (PPICS) to a question only version of the PICS without pictures (NPICS) [...].» (p. 7)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study was a longitudinal study including 66 typically developing infants and one of their parents. Data was collected when the infants were about 12, 18 and 24 months of age.» (p. 30)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«A series of analyses were conducted to examine differences between the two versions of the PICS questionnaire, the PICS version with pictures (PPICS) and the PICS version without pictures (NPICS). [...] The PPICS was administered to one group and the NPICS to the other. When the children were 12 months of age, parents completed the PICS and the MacArthur Communication Development Inventories - Short Form (MCDI) [...]. When the children were 18 months of age the PICS, MCDI and ESCS were administered again, along with the Expressive and Receptive Language Scales of the Mullen Scales of Early Learning [...]. When the children were 24 months of age the MCDI and Mullen were re-administered. Cross-sectional and longitudinal correlations between scores on the PICS, MCDI, ESCS and Mullen were assessed for both groups. The overall findings revealed the PPICS, as compared to the NPICS, at 12 months of age was more highly correlated to the ESCS. Both the PPICS and the NPICS did not correlate to language development. However, there was a trend for the PPICS than the NPICS at 12 months of age to have stronger correlations with language development at 18 months of age. These findings support the inclusion of pictures in screening tools for autism when administered in the child’s first year of life.» (p. X-XI)