Youth, Language, and Identity. Portraits of Students from English-Speaking High Schools in the Montreal Area

Youth, Language, and Identity. Portraits of Students from English-Speaking High Schools in the Montreal Area

Youth, Language, and Identity. Portraits of Students from English-Speaking High Schools in the Montreal Area

Youth, Language, and Identity. Portraits of Students from English-Speaking High Schools in the Montreal Areas

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [10265]

Gérin-Lajoie, Diane. 2011. Youth, Language, and Identity. Portraits of Students from English-Speaking High Schools in the Montreal Area. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of the study was to examine the process of identity construction in these youth [English speaking youth living in Montreal]; currently, little is known about their rapport to identity, language, and culture.» (p. 4)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Was the rapport to identity among youth in English-language schools much different from what I had found in Ontario among youth attending French-language schools? […] What kind of rapport to identity do these young people develop? Do they perceive themselves as having an Anglophone identity, a Francophone identity, a bilingual identity, etc.?» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The study was conducted in two different English-language school boards in the Montreal area.» (p. 8). In the first school, there were 545 students and in the second one, there were 713 students. Of all those students who answered the questionnaires, a subset of 115 got interviewed.

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the author, «[t]he analysis draws on the notion that one’s sense of belonging to a specific ethnic group is shaped and influenced by one’s social relations. Social practices are established largely through communication. Consequently, language plays a central role in one’s process of identity construction. The students who participated in this study established social practices predominantly in the family, at school, and among friends, three social milieux that have become less and less homogeneous linguistically and culturally, and in which youth are increasingly claiming a bilingual identity for themselves. The process of identity construction was examined within each of these three spheres, which are powerful sites for the reproduction of minority language and culture.» (p. 4)