Comparisons of the Success of Racial Minority Immigrant Offspring in the United States, Canada and Australia

Comparisons of the Success of Racial Minority Immigrant Offspring in the United States, Canada and Australia

Comparisons of the Success of Racial Minority Immigrant Offspring in the United States, Canada and Australia

Comparisons of the Success of Racial Minority Immigrant Offspring in the United States, Canada and Australias

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Référence bibliographique [10101]

Reitz, Jeffrey G., Zhang, Heather et Hawkins, Naoko. 2011. «Comparisons of the Success of Racial Minority Immigrant Offspring in the United States, Canada and Australia ». Social Science Research, vol. 40, no 4, p. 1051-1066.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
Cet article est une étude comparative de la réussite de la deuxième génération d’immigrants aux États-Unis, au Canada et en Australie.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The source of data for the United States is the Current Population Survey (CPS), now a standard source for study of the immigrant second generation in that country. We use a merged file combining seven distinct samples interviewed over the period 1995–2007 (US Bureau of the Census, 2006). For Canada, the 2001 public use census file identifies the second generation (Statistics Canada, 2006), and for Australia the 2001 public use census file, basic and expanded versions (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2003). The analysis builds on a previous paper (Reitz and Zhang, 2011) which examined educational attainments of the second generation in the US and Canada.» (p. 1052)
Pour le Canada, les auteurs s’intéressent aux villes de Toronto, de Montréal et de Vancouver.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«This paper extends existing analyses by providing direct comparison of the education, occupational status and incomes of the second generation between the United States, Canada and Australia. We examine specific origins groups such as whites, Afro-Caribbean blacks, Chinese, and South Asians to determine whether immigrant success, and the context of immigrant reception, affects the educational and employment success of immigrant offspring.» (p. 1051) «The overall conclusion is that cross-national differences in immigrant success across countries are largely eliminated for the second generation. In the second generation the success of Asians is common across countries. The difficulties of Afro- Caribbean blacks and to some extent other minorities is also common. Institutional processes affecting the relative status of minorities are largely unaffected by the variations in education and household income for the parental generation, so there is little ‘carry-over’ effect of relative economic standing. Some degree of minority status carry over is associated with levels of education of the parental generation, but not the implication that their relative education had for income levels. Institutional differences among the countries which affected the immigrant parents appear not to affect their offspring in the same way. [...] The generally high educational levels of the immigrant groups in question may be part of the explanation. Highly educated immigrant parents may impart the value of education to their children, and devote energy to ensure their children are successful perhaps in part to compensate for their own employment difficulties.» (p. 1063-1064)