Why Have Poorer Neighbourhoods Stagnated Economically while the Richer Have Flourished? Neighbourhood Income Inequality in Canadian Cities

Why Have Poorer Neighbourhoods Stagnated Economically while the Richer Have Flourished? Neighbourhood Income Inequality in Canadian Cities

Why Have Poorer Neighbourhoods Stagnated Economically while the Richer Have Flourished? Neighbourhood Income Inequality in Canadian Cities

Why Have Poorer Neighbourhoods Stagnated Economically while the Richer Have Flourished? Neighbourhood Income Inequality in Canadian Citiess

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Référence bibliographique [10086]

Chen, Wen-Hao, Myles, John et Picot, Garnett. 2012. «Why Have Poorer Neighbourhoods Stagnated Economically while the Richer Have Flourished? Neighbourhood Income Inequality in Canadian Cities ». Urban Studies, vol. 49, no 4, p. 877-896.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«First, we consider the spatial consequences of rising family income inequality on neighbourhood inequality, changes in the spatial distribution of income that result from the rising income disparity among families observed in Canada during the 1990s [...]. The second strand relates to research on neighbourhood poverty and urban economic segregation: a growing tendency of ‘like to live with like’.» (p. 877)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Just how different are average family incomes in rich and poor neighbourhoods?» (p. 880)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data for this paper are drawn from the micro-data files for the 20 per cent sample of the 1981, 1986, 1991, 1996, 2001 and 2006 Canadian censuses of population. We focus on the eight largest census metropolitan areas in Canada.» (p. 878-879)

Instruments :
Sondage

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[d]ifferences in neighbourhood income levels are the product of historical urban settlement patterns that are partially policy-induced (the result of zoning and other regulations governing urban development). However, the stagnation of disposable family income at the bottom of the neighbourhood income distribution since the 1980s is mainly a by product of broader trends in the distribution of family earnings that are the result of changes in labour markets and family composition. Nevertheless, our results also demonstrate that rising economic segregation cannot be entirely discounted as a contributing factor to the increase in neighbourhood inequality. We have pointed to the possibility that rising economic segregation may be partially endogenous, the result of higher levels of family income inequality.» (p. 892-893)
Note : Cet article présente des statistiques concernant Montréal.