Retirement at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: A Canadian Perspective

Retirement at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: A Canadian Perspective

Retirement at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: A Canadian Perspective

Retirement at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: A Canadian Perspectives

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Référence bibliographique [10060]

Dillon, Lisa, Gratton, Brian et Moen, Jon. 2010. «Retirement at the Turn of the Twentieth Century: A Canadian Perspective ». Canadian Historical Review, vol. 91, no 1, p. 27-59.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[W]e address three objectives: first, a straight forward recalculation of the labour force participation rate of older Canadian men in 1901; second, an evaluation of deliberate retirement before the modern era and the stages in the process toward it; and third, an assessment of factors that led men to report both an occupation and retirement in early-twentieth-century Canada.» (p. 31)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les auteurs utilisent le recensement canadien de 1901.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[t]hose who acknowledged retirement were distinct in their household and family circumstances, with those who remained heads of households less likely to dual report, as did those who lived with both their spouse and their children. In contrast, those who were fathers of the head, who lived alone, or only with their wives in an empty nest were more likely to report retirement alongside occupation. Finally, a man’s ‘relation to the means of production’ had an intimate relationship with retirement, with those living on their own means overwhelmingly more likely to acknowledge retirement. These major findings suggest other insights on the process of retirement, the place of retirement within the family life cycle, and the importance of regional economies for the wealth accumulation and cultural adjustment necessary for retirement. […] Second, our research suggests that Canadian family economies and intergenerational interdependence were shifting to accommodate personal wealth accumulation. The paterfamilias, with wife and child still in the household, was not likely to report himself retired. […] Third, retirement behaviour interacted with ethnicity, family practices, and province of residence in ways that underline the importance of regional economies and cultures.» (p. 56-57)
Note : Cette recherche présente les données sous forme de comparaisons interprovinciales.