Demographic Change, the Labour Force and Work-Family Conflicts the Challenge of Public Policy Adaptation

Demographic Change, the Labour Force and Work-Family Conflicts the Challenge of Public Policy Adaptation

Demographic Change, the Labour Force and Work-Family Conflicts the Challenge of Public Policy Adaptation

Demographic Change, the Labour Force and Work-Family Conflicts the Challenge of Public Policy Adaptations

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Référence bibliographique [10039]

Beaujot, Roderic. 2008. Demographic Change, the Labour Force and Work-Family Conflicts the Challenge of Public Policy Adaptation. Coll. «Discussion paper, no 08-03». London: Population Studies Centre. University of Western Ontario.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The author studies the «[s]lower population growth and aging [that] brings three over-riding concerns: (1) caring for larger numbers of frail elderly, (2) supporting families in their desires to have children, and (3) maximizing the labour force participation.» (p. 2)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’auteur utilise des données documentaires diverses et quelques enquêtes réalisés par Statistique Canada.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The focus on earning and caring highlights both the alternative models of families, and the differential needs for services depending on family structure and life course stage. In the complementary model of division of work, families can take responsibility for children as long as breadwinners are able to supply the needed income. Families who live by this traditional model of the division of work are most interested in workplace benefits that are associated with breadwinners, including provisions covering death and disability, and in subsidies from the larger society, such as child tax benefits or direct transfers. […] Depending on the priority attributed to work, some families have preferences for leaves associated with childbirth, and options to work part-time with good benefits when children are young. […] The options for child care are clearly most important here, especially for couples where both partners see themselves as continuous full-time participants in the labour force. Provisions for child care, along with other supports for work-life balance would probably also increase the numbers of couples who opt for a symmetric model of the division of work […]. The situation is very different for women in lone-parent families who are doing less market work and are more likely to prefer working more hours for more pay, even when they have young children. These women have fewer options for division of paid and unpaid work, and thus are the most likely to be using child care facilities, especially daycare centres.» (p. 13-14)
Note : La situation du Québec est étudiée par l’auteur.