Homeless in a Homeland: Housing (In)Security and Homelessness in Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

Homeless in a Homeland: Housing (In)Security and Homelessness in Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

Homeless in a Homeland: Housing (In)Security and Homelessness in Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

Homeless in a Homeland: Housing (In)Security and Homelessness in Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [10025]

Christensen, Julia Blythe. 2011. «Homeless in a Homeland: Housing (In)Security and Homelessness in Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada». Thèse de doctorat, Montréal, Université McGill, Département de géographie.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he primary aim of this doctoral research project is to understand how homelessness in the urbanizing regional centres of Inuvik and Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada, is produced and/or reproduced. My analysis demonstrates that visible homelessness in my two study communities is a contemporary manifestation of complex interactions between a (neo)colonial history, rapid sociocultural change, uneven economic development, and dependency on government for housing and income support.» (p. i)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«My study includes data gathered in Inuvik and Yellowknife from 2007 to 2009. Drawing on 150 in-depth interviews, six focus groups, and over eight months of participant observation with homeless people […].» (p. i) Note that 55 of the [s]emi-structured conversational interviews were conducted with representatives from the territorial and Aboriginal governments, representatives of non-governmental organizations, and support providers working in shelter provision, social work, and homeless advocacy.» (p. 118-119) Nighty-five biographical interviews were made with homeless persons. The author also used «[s]econdary data [that] consisted primarily of government documents on housing and income support policy and programs, statistics related to housing provision and core housing need, income support, employment, and addictions, and local newspaper articles published over the past 50 years that relate to housing issues and homelessness in the Northwest Territories.» (p. 129-130)

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif (pour les entretiens avec les informateurs)
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif (pour les entretiens avec les sans-abris)
- Guide d’entretien (pour les focus group)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


In this thesis, «[t]he first [objective] is to understand what factors comprise housing (in)security in a northern context and how they relate to northern homelessness. Through my analyses, I found that northern housing (in)security stems from a series of structural and individual factors that have challenged various elements of ‘home’. […] My second objective is to examine individual pathways to homelessness in order to better understand why certain individuals are vulnerable. My findings illustrate that among northern pathways to homelessness, there are common vulnerabilities present in seven key areas, demonstrating ‘compounded disadvantage’ as a concept of relevance in homeless peoples’ lives. […] My third objective is to comprehend how policy and economic factors affect housing insecurity and homelessness in the Northwest Territories. I found that contemporary policy and practice for both public and private rental housing, combined with shifts in employment policy and practice, have significant impacts on the homelessness pathways of northern men and women. […] My fourth objective is to understand the role of rural-urban dynamics in pathways to homelessness in Yellowknife and Inuvik. My investigation revealed that homelessness in the northern urban centres of Yellowknife and Inuvik is rooted in factors that emerge through urban spaces as well as rural ones.» (p. i-ii)
Note : La famille est évoquée en relation avec le premier objectif. Les ruptures et problèmes, souvent présents chez les familles aborigènes, constituent un facteur important d’instabilité conduisant à l’itinérance.