Urban Aboriginal Understandings and Experiences of Tuberculosis in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Urban Aboriginal Understandings and Experiences of Tuberculosis in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Urban Aboriginal Understandings and Experiences of Tuberculosis in Montreal, Quebec, Canada

Urban Aboriginal Understandings and Experiences of Tuberculosis in Montreal, Quebec, Canadas

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [10020]

Macdonald, Mary Ellen, Rigillo, Nicole et Brassard, Paul. 2010. «Urban Aboriginal Understandings and Experiences of Tuberculosis in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ». Qualitative Health Research, vol. 20, no 4, p. 506-523.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[W]e sought to understand the following: individual and community experience with TB; the role of the disease’s history in current beliefs and behaviors; the social and economic effects of TB; and experiences with health care services, including treatment and prevention.» (p. 509)

Questions/Hypothèses :
The research question of this article is: «What are the local Aboriginal understandings of and experiences with TB?» (p. 509)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«In total, 27 participants were recruited within a 3-month period in 2007.» (p. 509) «This qualitative research study was initiated based on results from our previous quantitative research during which we found high prevalence rates of latent TB infection (LTBI) and low adherence to subsequent medical evaluation and treatment at the NFCM.» (p. 509)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be a serious health issue for some Aboriginal populations in Canada.[...] Thematic analysis revealed a high level of experiential knowledge among participants, although gaps in biomedical knowledge about the disease and available resources were apparent even among those who had been ill. Negative memories and experiences relating to the colonial history of TB treatment emerged as significant for many participants, helping to explain a silence around the topic of TB in the community. Barriers to TB testing were identified, including the fear of positive test results, the burden of long-term treatment for either latent or active disease, and systemic barriers within and mistrust of the health system. Community support for, as well as negative reactions toward, individuals ill with TB were identified. We conclude with a number of community health lessons to address the treatment and prevention of TB in urban populations.» (p. 506)
Note : In this article, the family theme is recurrent. The authors discuss the negative effects of sanatoria on Aboriginal famililales relationships. In addition, sanatoria partially explains the high rate of TB among indigenous and taboo associated with this illness. The majority of Aboriginal with TB tend not to talk with their family for fear of being rejected, which makes the treatment more complicated.