Canada’s Live-In Caregiver Program: Is it an Answer to the Growing Demand for Elderly Care?

Canada’s Live-In Caregiver Program: Is it an Answer to the Growing Demand for Elderly Care?

Canada’s Live-In Caregiver Program: Is it an Answer to the Growing Demand for Elderly Care?

Canada’s Live-In Caregiver Program: Is it an Answer to the Growing Demand for Elderly Care?s

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Référence bibliographique [905]

Journal of Population Ageing, vol. 3, p. 83-102.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper draws upon data from a larger research study that addresses some of the important gaps in our knowledge about the role of immigrant care workers in the home and long- term care sectors in Canada, with a specific focus on those who have entered through the LCP [Live in Caregiver Program]. We begin with a background description and evolution of the program followed by what elements of this program others have researched. We then describe the neglected topics that our data address, specifically how working within the specifications of this program has clear implications for the would-be immigrants themselves but also has implications for relations with older adult clients.» (p. 84)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This paper presents data, from a larger international comparative study, of the experiences of 19 workers who came to Canada through the LCP who were at the time of contact were working in a range of different health care institutions and private households in three provincial contexts: Hamilton/Toronto Ontario, Vancouver/Victoria, British Columbia and Montreal, Quebec. The data were collected via interviews (n=12) and focus groups (two with a total of seven participants) from September 2007 until June 2008.» (p. 89)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Our findings reveal a paradoxical relationship: some workers are treated as part of the family whereas others can be taken advantage of and burdened with enormous responsibilities. Such responsibilities surpass those of non-live in older adult care in general. At the same time, there are some clear similarities in the experiences of LCP workers and immigrant carers working in long-term and home care settings for older adults. For instance, our finding with regards to confusion caused by language barriers on the part of the client and the tensions that it introduces into older adult-carer relationships is reflective of the difficulties experienced by immigrant care workers and their older adult clients more broadly (Bourgeault et al. 2010). In large part, it is the live in component that creates some unique challenges—particularly its influence on working and living conditions. We were surprised to find that the issue of trust vis-à-vis older adult clients was not as salient in the interviews with LCP workers as interviews with immigrant care workers in general (Bourgeault et al. 2010). We anticipated that live-in care workers would be subject to a greater chance of being accused of stealing or abuse because of the private nature of the work setting. Perhaps this is due to the fact that the issues of living and working conditions are of greater importance and salience to live-in caregivers. » (p. 98-99) The consequences of the LCP for the family members of the workers are part of this research.