Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy Syndrome: The Case of an 11-year-old Boy Presenting with Hyperactivity

Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy Syndrome: The Case of an 11-year-old Boy Presenting with Hyperactivity

Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy Syndrome: The Case of an 11-year-old Boy Presenting with Hyperactivity

Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy Syndrome: The Case of an 11-year-old Boy Presenting with Hyperactivitys

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Référence bibliographique [7183]

Amirali, Evangelia L., Bezonsky, Rhona et McDonough, Rita. 1998. «Culture and Munchausen-by-proxy Syndrome: The Case of an 11-year-old Boy Presenting with Hyperactivity ». Revue canadienne de psychiatrie / Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 43, no 6, p. 632-637.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« To discuss some of the challenges presented to the clinician who deals with a possible Munchausen-by-proxy (MBP) syndrom. » (p. 632)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The case of an 11 year old boy presenting with hyperactivity is discussed. Information from the initial assessment and the 9 months follow-up period is presented. » (p. 632)

Instruments :
Case study

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The case described below illustrates some of the above issues and highlights factors to consider in the differents diagnosis of MBP syndrom: developmental and medical health, family history, examination, diagnostic impression and treatment and follow-up. » (p. 632) « The positive outcome is discussed in relation to the validation of the diagnosis as well as to cultural issues. Cultural issues and dynamic factors may be important when we consider the diagnosis of MBP syndrome in an immigrant family with different expectations from our health care system. » (p. 632) « The comparatively rapid amelioration of the boy’s symptoms, as well as his mother’s psychological change and her ability to form a substancial therapeutic alliance, has made us question our diagnosis of MBP syndrome and consider ’parent child’ problem’ as a more appropriate diagnosis for the boy. This is supported by the boy’s ready admission that he ’felt alright’ and by his ability to identify his mother as a significant part of his problem. » (p. 634)