Participant Perception of an Integrated Program for Substance Abuse in Pregnancy

Participant Perception of an Integrated Program for Substance Abuse in Pregnancy

Participant Perception of an Integrated Program for Substance Abuse in Pregnancy

Participant Perception of an Integrated Program for Substance Abuse in Pregnancys

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Référence bibliographique [635]

Lefebvre, Lisa, Midmer, Deana, Boyd, Jennifer Ann, Ordean, Alice, Graves, Lisa, Kahan, Meldon et Pantea, Lydia. 2010. «Participant Perception of an Integrated Program for Substance Abuse in Pregnancy ». Journal of Obstetric Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, vol. 39, no 1, p. 46-52.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The objective of this study is « [t]o assess participant perception of an integrated model of care for substance abuse in pregnancy. » (p. 46)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Two focus groups were conducted in Montreal, to which14 women were invited; Group1 had four participants and Group 2 had one (this group was offered in French for the few francophone women at the clinic). Only one woman attended the French focus group; therefore, it resembled an individual interview, and unfortunately, the richness afforded by the interaction between participants in a focus group was lost. Of the 43 women invited to participate in the Toronto focus groups, 14 were recruited. Group 1 had three participants, Group 2 had two,
and Group 3 had nine. The differing numbers of participants in each group is to be expected in a population that is transient and difficult to study. » (p. 49)

Instruments:
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The results of this study confirmed that women with problematic substance use in pregnancy preferred an integrated obstetric care model and perceived less stigma and fewer barriers to care in this model. Women reported feeling more comfortable and secure when interacting with their health care providers due to the consistent nonjudgmental approach taken by the integrated team and said they would be more likely to return for follow-up. Good communication by the treatment team kept any mixed messages from being passed on. The women also appreciated the rich treatment resources and support readily available within the programs. The self-responsibility encouraged in the ICM [Integrated Care Models] helped the women to interact more positively with child protective services. This is consistent with previous reports that patients face significant stigma surrounding addiction and motherhood that may deter them from seeking treatment if they anticipate difficulties with child welfare authorities or criminal charges (Andrulis & Hopkins, 2001).The fact that the integrated program was nestled within a regular family medicine clinic instead of within an addiction treatment program may also have contributed to the women’s increased comfort level. » (p. 51-52)