Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program “Incredible Years” in a Child Protection Service

Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program “Incredible Years” in a Child Protection Service

Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program “Incredible Years” in a Child Protection Service

Effectiveness of a Parent Training Program “Incredible Years” in a Child Protection Services

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Référence bibliographique [627]

Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 34, no 4, p. 253-261.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of ’Incredible Years’ in a child protection service, with trained professionals from the agency acting as facilitators for parent groups. More specifically, this study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this program in improving: (1) parenting practices; (2) parents’ feeling of self-efficacy and; (3) parents’ perception of their child’s behavior. » (p. 254)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The final sample consisted in 35 parents divided among 2 groups: (1) PTP [parent training programs] group having participated in the Incredible Years Program (n = 26); (2) and the Control group (n = 9). » (p. 255)

Instruments :
- Parenting Practice Interview (PPI; Webster-Stratton, 1998)
- Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Findings of the present study show that the program has a positive impact on parenting practices and parents’ perception of their child’s behavior. Indeed, following their participation in Incredible Years, parents use less harsh discipline, more praise and incentives, more appropriate discipline and more positive verbal discipline. They also have better monitoring strategies versus the control group. Though the effect of the program on child abuse and/or neglect was not assessed, these results are promising as an improvement in parenting practices might lead to fewer situations of abuse or neglect (Gershater- Molko et al., 2002; Herbert, 2000). Furthermore, following their participation in this program, parents in this study observed fewer and less frequent disruptive behaviors in their child. Results also show that many of the parents who participated in the PTP perceived that their child grew out of the ’clinical level’ in regard to the number and the frequency of their behavior problems. […] However, the results of the present study do not show any effect of the program on the expression of clear expectations or on parents’ self-efficacy. » (p. 259)