Family Allowances and Family Autonomy: Quebec Families Encounter The Welfare State, 1945-1955

Family Allowances and Family Autonomy: Quebec Families Encounter The Welfare State, 1945-1955

Family Allowances and Family Autonomy: Quebec Families Encounter The Welfare State, 1945-1955

Family Allowances and Family Autonomy: Quebec Families Encounter The Welfare State, 1945-1955s

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Référence bibliographique [6217]

Jean, Dominique. 2000. «Family Allowances and Family Autonomy: Quebec Families Encounter The Welfare State, 1945-1955». Dans Canadian Family History: Selected Readings , sous la dir. de Bettina Bradbury, p. 401-437. Toronto: Irwin Publishing.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper seeks to assess the impact of one major policy of the postwar welfare state-family allowances- on the economic and social autonomy of Canadian families. » (p. 401)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« [T]he rich array of documents existing in the archives of the government departments in charge of implementing the program. » (p. 401)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« The study of the family allowances inaugurated in 1945 offers an interesting window into the history of Canadian families and their relation with the welfare state, because they were the first universal measure of social security in the country. On one hand, state agents and social workers were particularly curious about the impact of such a novelty, so they undertook many investigations of the impact and the use made of the allowances. On the other hand, families were especially conscious of this new intervention of the state in their lives. The first part of this paper outlines the major goals articulated by politicians ans the various social groups that promoted family allowances. The second part focussed on the ideology of the family that pervaded the program. Next, I analyse the educationnal campaign, wich was the main public tool of intervention in family consumption patterns, and contrast these intentions with the program’s effects on the incomes and expenditure patterns of rural and urban families. Finally, I describe the struggle for the indexation of allowances, an episode that helps to explain family practices and the political leverage of poor clients of the welfare state. The first sections of the paper address Canada as a whole, while the discussion of the effects of family allowances on families focusses on the province of Quebec. » (p. 402)