Gender, Social Relationships and Depressive Disorders in Adults aged 65 and over in Quebec

Gender, Social Relationships and Depressive Disorders in Adults aged 65 and over in Quebec

Gender, Social Relationships and Depressive Disorders in Adults aged 65 and over in Quebec

Gender, Social Relationships and Depressive Disorders in Adults aged 65 and over in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [595]

Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia, Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria, Préville, Michel et Dubé, Micheline. 2010. «Gender, Social Relationships and Depressive Disorders in Adults aged 65 and over in Quebec ». Chronic Diseases in Canada, vol. 30, no 2, p. 56-65.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this study was to examine if social relationships have a differential association with the presence of depression in men and women aged 65 and over.» (p. 56)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data came from a survey of a representative sample of 2670 community-dwelling older adults in Quebec.» (p. 56) «Data were collected through at-home, face-to-face interviews. Details on data collection procedures are given in a previous publication.» (p. 57) Note that there is an abstract in Famili@ for this previous publication: Mechakra-Tahiri, Samia et al., «Social relationships and depression among people 65 years and over living in rural and urban areas of Quebec»

Instruments :
- «Depressive disorders were measured using DSM-IV criteria.» (p. 56)
- «The respondents’ depression status (including major and minor depression) was measured using the computer-based ESA-Q.» (p. 57)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[t]he prevalence of depression was 17.8% for women and 7.6% for men. Men reported a greater diversity of ties but less support than women. Having a confidant and/or being engaged in a good marital relationship was negatively associated with depression in both men and women. Compared with married people in general, widowhood was associated with a considerably higher risk of depression in men than in women. Compared with non-volunteers in general, men who volunteer were at considerably lower risk of depression than women who volunteer. This exploratory study could serve as a basis for future longitudinal studies on the impact of community activities and volunteering on the incidence and remission of depression in older men and women in Canada.» (p. 56)