Twinning Projects between Immigrant Families and Quebecois Families: Volunteer Work, Mutual Aid, or Intervention?

Twinning Projects between Immigrant Families and Quebecois Families: Volunteer Work, Mutual Aid, or Intervention?

Twinning Projects between Immigrant Families and Quebecois Families: Volunteer Work, Mutual Aid, or Intervention?

Twinning Projects between Immigrant Families and Quebecois Families: Volunteer Work, Mutual Aid, or Intervention?s

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Référence bibliographique [4960]

Journal of International Migration and Integration, vol. 4, no 4, p. 453-470.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« Our concern here is with the domestic processes at work in twinning projects implemented by community organizations and funded by the Ministère des Relations avec les Citoyens et de l’Immigration. » (résumé, p. 453)

2. Méthode


Échantillon :
« 75 twinned families (with one or more members of each family depending on their linguistic abilities and the involvement of each in the twinning program). » (p. 457)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Twinning projects between immigrants and local residents are often analyzed from the viewpoint of intercultural relations or adaptation to the host society. This draws from a research project carried out among seventy-five twinned families, half of which are Quebecois and half immigrants of diverse origins. [...] Our analysis centers around the different forms of appropriation open to actors: volunteer work, intervention, and mutual aid. » (résumé, p. 453). « Throughout our research on twinning projects between Quebecois and neo-Quebecois families, we had the opportunity to analyse in detail the processes at work in twinships between volunteer and unremunerated families. In the context of this research project we believed it was important to identify the meanings that actors attributed to their encounters, both formal and informal, with others in the framework of these programs. Our analysis allowed us to identify how various notions of involvement discerned through personal motives, but also through perceptions of self and others-can be cross-referenced. » (p. 455)