Maternal Preoccupation and Parenting as Predictors of Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children of Women with Breast Cancer

Maternal Preoccupation and Parenting as Predictors of Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children of Women with Breast Cancer

Maternal Preoccupation and Parenting as Predictors of Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children of Women with Breast Cancer

Maternal Preoccupation and Parenting as Predictors of Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children of Women with Breast Cancers

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Référence bibliographique [4550]

Sigal, John J., Perry, Christopher J., Robbins, James M., Gagné, Marie-Anik et Nassif, Edgard. 2003. «Maternal Preoccupation and Parenting as Predictors of Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children of Women with Breast Cancer ». Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 21, no 6, p. 1155-1160.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study was designed to examine the hypothesis that physically ill mothers’ preoccupation with their illness and their parenting behavior can result in psychologic disturbances in their children. » (p. 1158)
Questions/Hypothèses :
« [...] [W]e hypothesize that children of the less ill mothers with breast cancer will have fewer psychologic symptoms than children of sicker mothers and that the severity of children’s psychologic symptoms will be directly proportional to the degree of their mothers’ preoccupation with their illness and the quality of their parenting. » (p. 1156)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
87 femmes atteintes le cancer du sein (entre 35-55 ans)

Instruments :
- The Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL);
- the Self-Perception Profile for Children;
- the Impact of Events Scale (IES);
- the Cognitive Intrusive Questionnaire (CIQ);
- the Parent’s Report Questionnaire (PRQ)
Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« PURPOSE: To test the hypothesis that differences between sicker and not-so-sick women in their preoccupation with their illness and parenting behavior can explain why some investigators find that children of breast cancer patients fare better than controls and other investigators find the reverse.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: Forty-two women with metastasized breast cancer (sicker mothers) and 45 women with a first occurrence of nonmetastasized breast cancer (not-so-sick mothers) rated the degree of their preoccupation with the disease, their parenting behavior, mood, and social supports and the emotional and behavioral symptoms in one of their children. Their 12- to 18-year-old children rated their mothers’ parenting behavior, their own emotional and behavioral symptoms, and their self-esteem.
RESULTS: Sicker mothers reported relatively less preoccupation. They, and their children, reported less poor parenting and fewer externalizing symptoms in the children. Regression analyses revealed further differences between the groups.
CONCLUSION: Less preoccupation with their illness and less poor parenting behavior by sicker mothers may explain why their children seem to fare better then those of not-so-sick mothers. Formulations concerning families of breast cancer patients should include consideration of the effect of the mothers’ perception of the severity of their illness. » (p. 1155)