Immigrant Parents’ Investments in Their Children’s Post-Secondary Education

Immigrant Parents’ Investments in Their Children’s Post-Secondary Education

Immigrant Parents’ Investments in Their Children’s Post-Secondary Education

Immigrant Parents’ Investments in Their Children’s Post-Secondary Educations

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Référence bibliographique [448]

La revue canadienne d’enseignement supérieur / Canadian Journal of Higher Education, vol. 40, no 3, p. 59-80.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This paper examines relationships between the resources available to immigrant families and the amount parents are willing and able to save for their children’s post-secondary education (PSE).» (p. 59)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data for this analysis are drawn from the public use fi le for the 2002 Survey of Approaches to Educational Planning (SAEP). The target population for the SAEP is children between the ages of 0 and 18 living in all 10 provinces in Canada.» (p. 64) The authors used a subset of 5,580 respondents «[...] who provided personal, family, school, and community information that related to a single child selected from their household.» (p. 64)

Instruments :
Sondage

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


The authors conclude that «[i]mmigrant families are as involved in their children’s growth and development as non-immigrant families. Moreover, their parenting practices appear to be much the same as the intensive parenting approach. Immigrants and non-immigrants both establish home-learning environments that include attention to homework, communicating with children, and involvement in extra-curricular and social activities. There are distinct differences in the achievement of children from families with one or two foreign-born parents. Children from the latter group excel in their studies while children from the former group have achievement levels that are similar to non-immigrant children. In general, children’s achievement reinforces parents’ commitment of resources. However, in the case of immigrant families this basic relationship needs qualification. In families with two foreign-born parents, children have relatively high levels of achievement but their parents’ lower incomes and less-settled housing arrangements make PSE savings difficult. In families with one foreign-born parent, children’s achievement demonstrates less commitment but their parents’ aspirations and wealth appear sufficient to sustain relatively high levels of PSE savings. The extent to which children’s school performance influences differently situated but similarly motivated immigrant parents’ investment of family resources remains an important issue that needs further research.» (p. 73) Note that the results are shown by provinces.