The Effectiveness of Selected Interventions for Previous Maltreatment: Enhancing the Well-being of Children Who Live at Home

The Effectiveness of Selected Interventions for Previous Maltreatment: Enhancing the Well-being of Children Who Live at Home

The Effectiveness of Selected Interventions for Previous Maltreatment: Enhancing the Well-being of Children Who Live at Home

The Effectiveness of Selected Interventions for Previous Maltreatment: Enhancing the Well-being of Children Who Live at Homes

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Référence bibliographique [4302]

Dufour, Sarah et Chamberland, Claire. 2004. «The Effectiveness of Selected Interventions for Previous Maltreatment: Enhancing the Well-being of Children Who Live at Home ». Child and Family Social Work, vol. 9, no 1, p. 39-56.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This paper presents a critical analysis of reviews of studies published since 1984 concerning effectiveness of selected child maltreatment interventions. » (p. 54)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
50 reviews of evaluation studies and six individual evaluation studies

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« The authors critically assessed reviews of the literature published between 1984 and 2002 to describe the state-of-knowledge about the effectiveness of interventions aimed at protecting or improving the welfare of child victims of maltreatment and who remain in the family home. The interventions studied target children, parents or families. They chiefly involve cases of sexual abuse, physical abuse or neglect; very few concern psychological abuse or exposure to violence. For the most part, the intervention effectiveness indicators measure changes in parents’ and children’s knowledge (e.g. better knowledge of child development), attitude (e.g. gains in enthusiasm), emotion (e.g. decreased anxiety) and behaviour (e.g. decreased rates of aversive behaviours). Few assessments follow up on participants to determine whether the changes are lasting. The small number of evaluative studies, methodological limitations and disparities in the content and the carrying out of interventions make it difficult to draw sound conclusions about the effectiveness of interventions, even for interventions most often and most favourably assessed, such as behavioural and cognitive-behavioural interventions with maltreating parents. Implications for practice, research and policy are underlined. » (p. 39)