The Impact of Parental Borderline Personality Disorder on Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

The Impact of Parental Borderline Personality Disorder on Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

The Impact of Parental Borderline Personality Disorder on Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parents

The Impact of Parental Borderline Personality Disorder on Vulnerability to Depression in Children of Affectively Ill Parentss

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Référence bibliographique [3958]

Journal of Personality Disorders, vol. 19, no 1, p. 68-83.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study examines whether children of parents with comorbid MDD [major depressive disorder] and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) (1) are at greater risk for experiencing depressive symptoms and/or episodes and (2) whether such increased risk may be due, in part, to their exhibiting higher levels of cognitive/interpersonal vulnerability factors. » (p. 68)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Participants were recruited through ads placed in local newspapers as well as through posters placed throughout the greater Montreal area […]. The final sample consisted of 140 children (69 boys and 71 girls) and one of their parents (88 mothers and 14 fathers). In all cases, the parent met criteria for either a current or past major depressive episode. Children’s ages ranged from 6 to 14 with a median age of 10. Parents’ ages ranged from 27 to 53 with a median age of 41. » (p. 70)

Instruments :
- The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM–IV (SCID–I; First et al., 1995);
- The Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM–IV Personality Disorders (SCID–II; First et al., 1997);
- Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School–Age Children, Present Version (K–SADS, Kaufman et al., 1996);
- Children’s Attributional Style Questionnaire (CASQ; Seligman et al., 1984);
- Children’s Response Style Questionnaire (CRSQ; Abela, Vanderbilt, & Rochon, 2004);
- Children’s Self–Esteem Questionnaire (SEQ; Rosenberg, 1965);
- Children’s Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale–Revised (CDAS–R; Abela & Sullivan, 2003);
- Children’s Depressive Experiences Questionnaire (CDEQ; Abela & Taxel, 2001);
- Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment (IPPA; Armsden & Greenberg, 1987);
- The Reassurance–Seeking Scale for Children (RSSC; Joiner & Metalsky, 1995).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Children of parents with major depressive disorder (MDD) are four to six times more likely than other children to develop MDD. Little research has examined whether comorbid parental diagnoses further increase children’s risk. […] Children (n=140; ages 6-14) of parents with MDD completed measures assessing cognitive/interpersonal vulnerability factors. Parents completed semi–structured clinical interviews assessing severity of current depressive symptoms and BPD. Both children and parents completed a semi–structured clinical interview assessing the child’s current and past history of MDD. Children of parents with comorbid MDD and BPD exhibited higher levels of current depressive symptoms and higher levels of cognitive/interpersonal vulnerability factors than children of parents with MDD but no BPD, even after controlling for parents’ current levels of depressive symptoms. The relationship between parental BPD and children’s current levels of depressive symptoms was partially mediated by children’s cognitive/interpersonal vulnerability factors. Last, children of parents with comorbid BPD and MDD were 6.84 times more likely to exhibit a current or past diagnosis of MDD. » (p. 68)