The Timing of Parent and Child Depression: A Hopelessness Theory Perspective

The Timing of Parent and Child Depression: A Hopelessness Theory Perspective

The Timing of Parent and Child Depression: A Hopelessness Theory Perspective

The Timing of Parent and Child Depression: A Hopelessness Theory Perspectives

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Référence bibliographique [3342]

Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, vol. 35, no 2, p. 253-263.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goal of this study was to examine whether children possessing a depressogenic weakest link report greater increases in depressive symptoms following increases in their parents’ levels of depressive symptoms than children not possessing a depressogenic weakest link. » (p. 254)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The final sample consisted of 140 children (69 boys and 71 girls) and one of their parents (88 mothers and 14 fathers). Thirty-eight sibling pairs were included in the final sample. […] Phase 1 of the study involved an initial laboratory assessment. Two research assistants met with one parent–child pair at a time. » (p. 255) During the second phase of the study, the children and the parent were contacted by phone eight times to answers questions. « Phase 3 of the study occurred 1 year after Phase 1 and involved a final laboratory assessment during which a research assistant verbally administered the CASQ and CCSQ to the child. » (p. 256)

Instruments :
- Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI; Kovacs, 1981);
- Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck,Ward, Mendelson, Mock, & Erbaugh, 1961);
- « CASQ (Seligman et al., 1984). The CASQ contains 48 items. Each item is a hypothetical event that children are asked to imagine happened to them. » (p. 256);
- « CCSQ (Abela, 2001). The CCSQ is a two-part questionnaire. Each part contains 12 items, each of which is a hypothetical negative event involving the Child. » (p. 257).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This study examined whether children’s inferential styles moderate the association between the onset of depressive symptoms in children and their parents. To provide a powerful test of our hypothesis, we utilized a high-risk sample (parents with a history of major depressive episodes and their children) and a multiwave longitudinal design. During the initial assessment, 140 children (ages 6 to 14) completed measures assessing depressogenic inferential styles. Parents and children also completed measures assessing current level of depressive symptoms. Following the initial assessment, children and parents were contacted every 6 weeks for the next year to complete measures assessing depressive symptoms. The results of hierarchical linear modeling analysis indicated that children who exhibited depressogenic inferential styles reported greater elevations in depressive symptoms following elevations in their parent’s level of depressive symptoms than did children who did not exhibit such styles. The strength of this association was greater in girls. » (p. 253)