Comparison between Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and their Parents Concerning Perceived Quality of Life

Comparison between Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and their Parents Concerning Perceived Quality of Life

Comparison between Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and their Parents Concerning Perceived Quality of Life

Comparison between Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) and their Parents Concerning Perceived Quality of Lifes

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Référence bibliographique [3333]

Quality of Life Research, vol. 15, no 4, p. 655-661.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The primary objectives of this study were to determine agreement between children with JIA [juvenile idiopathic arthritis] and their parents regarding the child’s quality of life and to explore whether factors such as age, disease duration and disease severity are associated with this agreement. The secondary objective was to examine whether age, disease duration and disease severity were associated with perceptions of quality of life. » (p. 656)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« We hypothesized that agreement would be good for all dimensions of the JAQQ [Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire], but lowest for pain. » (p. 656)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Fifty patients aged 9-18 years and their parents, who attended the JIA clinic at the Montreal Children’s Hospital [participated in this study.] » (p. 655)

Instruments :
« [T]he Juvenile Arthritis Quality of Life Questionnaire (JAQQ). » (p. 655)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Good agreement levels indicate that parents and children perceive the children’s quality of life similarly with respect to gross motor function, psychosocial function, symptoms, pain and overall quality of life. However, agreement was lower for fine motor function. This could be problematic because fine motor function is important for many activities of daily living even if it is not as noticeable as gross motor function. It could diminish their ability to perform activities in a variety of settings and even bring frustration that could possibly lead to low self esteem and loneliness. » (p. 660)