Health-Related Quality of Life in Postpartum Depressed Women

Health-Related Quality of Life in Postpartum Depressed Women

Health-Related Quality of Life in Postpartum Depressed Women

Health-Related Quality of Life in Postpartum Depressed Womens

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Référence bibliographique [3217]

Da Costa, Deborah, Dritsa, Maria, Rippen, Natalie, Lowensteyn, Ilka et Khalifé, Samir. 2006. «Health-Related Quality of Life in Postpartum Depressed Women ». Archives of Women’s Mental Health, vol. 9, no 2, p. 95-102.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« The goals of the present study were to (a) evaluate HRQoL in women experiencing postpartum depression, (b) examine the association between severity of depressive symptoms and level of impairment in physical and mental health status and (c) delineate factors associated with physical and mental health status among women depressed in the postpartum. » (p. 96)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Seventy-eight women scoring =10 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale completed the questionnaires measuring: HRQoL (Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short form SF-36), sleep quality, life stress, and social support. » (p. 95)
« Women in the postpartum period (4–38 weeks) experiencing symptoms of postpartum depression were recruited at obstetrician=gynecologists offices and through media advertisement, pamphlets and flyers sent to delivery units of major hospitals in the Montreal area and to community health facilities (CLSC). » (p. 96)
« The mean age of the sample was 33.17 (SD = 4.56) years, ranging from 19 to 43 years. » (p. 98)

Instruments :
- Guide d’entretien téléphonique semi-structuré;
- Le Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) (Cox et al., 1987) (p. 97);
- Le Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form-36 (Ware & Sherbourne, 1992) (idem);
- Le Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) (Buysse et al., 1989) (idem).

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« Compared to Canadian normative data, women experiencing postpartum depressed mood scored significantly lower on all SF-36 domains, as well as on the SF-36 physical and mental component summary score. Severity of depressed mood was not associated to worse physical health status, while poorer aerobic capacity emerged as a significant independent contributor of physical health status. Severity of depressed mood contributed to worse mental health status. After controlling for severity of depressed mood, the occurrence of pregnancy complications, cesarean delivery, poorer sleep quality, life stress, and less social support predicted poorer mental health status. » (p. 95)